SELECTING MARINE RESERVES USING HABITATS AND SPECIES ASSEMBLAGES AS SURROGATES FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

SELECTING MARINE RESERVES USING HABITATS AND SPECIES ASSEMBLAGES AS SURROGATES FOR BIOLOGICAL... We compare the value of using habitat categories and species assemblages as surrogates for marine biological diversity in the context of choosing a set of representative areas for a marine reserve network. Habitat categories were based on interpretation of aerial photographs and maps, and on local knowledge. Species assemblages were created from comprehensive survey data on 977 taxa (mainly species), derived from an intensive three-year study of a temperate marine embayment, and classified into plant, fish, and invertebrate assemblages. Reserves were selected using a heuristic iterative algorithm to simulate a marine reserve network based on 10––80%% representation of each surrogate. The effectiveness of each surrogate was evaluated by comparing the number of taxa that would be coincidentally included in each simulated reserve for the bay. Areas selected to represent 10%% or 20%% of the surrogates were best chosen using fish or invertebrate assemblages, because by spatial coincidence, they included 60––80%% of all available taxa. However, areas selected to represent ≥≥40%% of the surrogates were generally best derived from habitat categories, because they included ≥≥93%% of all available taxa. Plant assemblages were generally poor surrogates for overall species richness. These findings suggest that habitat-level surrogates may be a highly cost-effective method for initial identification of high-priority areas to manage marine diversity of coastal ecosystems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Applications Ecological Society of America

SELECTING MARINE RESERVES USING HABITATS AND SPECIES ASSEMBLAGES AS SURROGATES FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

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Publisher
Ecological Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the Ecological Society of America
Subject
Articles
ISSN
1051-0761
DOI
10.1890/1051-0761%281999%29009%5B0691:SMRUHA%5D2.0.CO%3B2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We compare the value of using habitat categories and species assemblages as surrogates for marine biological diversity in the context of choosing a set of representative areas for a marine reserve network. Habitat categories were based on interpretation of aerial photographs and maps, and on local knowledge. Species assemblages were created from comprehensive survey data on 977 taxa (mainly species), derived from an intensive three-year study of a temperate marine embayment, and classified into plant, fish, and invertebrate assemblages. Reserves were selected using a heuristic iterative algorithm to simulate a marine reserve network based on 10––80%% representation of each surrogate. The effectiveness of each surrogate was evaluated by comparing the number of taxa that would be coincidentally included in each simulated reserve for the bay. Areas selected to represent 10%% or 20%% of the surrogates were best chosen using fish or invertebrate assemblages, because by spatial coincidence, they included 60––80%% of all available taxa. However, areas selected to represent ≥≥40%% of the surrogates were generally best derived from habitat categories, because they included ≥≥93%% of all available taxa. Plant assemblages were generally poor surrogates for overall species richness. These findings suggest that habitat-level surrogates may be a highly cost-effective method for initial identification of high-priority areas to manage marine diversity of coastal ecosystems.

Journal

Ecological ApplicationsEcological Society of America

Published: May 1, 1999

Keywords: biological diversity ; fish ; habitats and species assemblages as surrogates ; invertebrates ; marine biodiversity management ; marine protected areas ; minimum set ; plants ; species richness

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