LANDSCAPE FRAGMENTATION AND FOREST COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON GROUSE BREEDING SUCCESS IN BOREAL FORESTS

LANDSCAPE FRAGMENTATION AND FOREST COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON GROUSE BREEDING SUCCESS IN BOREAL FORESTS We examined the breeding success of forest grouse in relation to anthropogenic forest fragmentation in Finland. Employing Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and grouse data derived from Finnish wildlife triangle censuses conducted during 1989––1994, we combined the locations of 2267 Black Grouse ( Tetrao tetrix ) and 1060 Capercaillie ( T. urogallus ) females after the breeding season in mid-August with landscape data. The indicators of breeding success were the proportion of grouse hens with a brood and brood size. Two study areas (each 45 000 km 2 ) in the boreal zone were selected for investigation. The breeding success of grouse was negatively correlated with both fragmentation of forest area per se by farmland and the decreasing proportion of older forest as a result of clear-cutting. The extent of landscape accounting best for variation in nesting success was an order of magnitude larger (∼∼100 km 2 ) than the area most probably used by a grouse female and her brood during the summer, which suggests that landscape-scale factors may override local factors such as track size and distance from edge. The proportion of grouse hens with a brood was lower in heavily fragmented landscapes than in more continuous forest landscapes whereas only minor differences in brood size were detected. We suggest that the most likely cause of the observed spatial correlation was higher nest predation by generalist predators in fragmented forest landscapes. The effects of landscape composition on the breeding success of grouse were more marked in northern than in southern Finland, probably because predator populations are more food-regulated in the north. The diminished breeding success of forest grouse as a result of increased forest fragmentation is a probable cause of population declines in forest grouse species during the past decades in Fennoscandia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecology Ecological Society of America

LANDSCAPE FRAGMENTATION AND FOREST COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON GROUSE BREEDING SUCCESS IN BOREAL FORESTS

Ecology, Volume 81 (7) – Jul 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ecological-society-of-america/landscape-fragmentation-and-forest-composition-effects-on-grouse-C53XuE6jtS
Publisher
Ecological Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by the Ecological Society of America
Subject
Articles
ISSN
0012-9658
D.O.I.
10.1890/0012-9658%282000%29081%5B1985:LFAFCE%5D2.0.CO%3B2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We examined the breeding success of forest grouse in relation to anthropogenic forest fragmentation in Finland. Employing Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and grouse data derived from Finnish wildlife triangle censuses conducted during 1989––1994, we combined the locations of 2267 Black Grouse ( Tetrao tetrix ) and 1060 Capercaillie ( T. urogallus ) females after the breeding season in mid-August with landscape data. The indicators of breeding success were the proportion of grouse hens with a brood and brood size. Two study areas (each 45 000 km 2 ) in the boreal zone were selected for investigation. The breeding success of grouse was negatively correlated with both fragmentation of forest area per se by farmland and the decreasing proportion of older forest as a result of clear-cutting. The extent of landscape accounting best for variation in nesting success was an order of magnitude larger (∼∼100 km 2 ) than the area most probably used by a grouse female and her brood during the summer, which suggests that landscape-scale factors may override local factors such as track size and distance from edge. The proportion of grouse hens with a brood was lower in heavily fragmented landscapes than in more continuous forest landscapes whereas only minor differences in brood size were detected. We suggest that the most likely cause of the observed spatial correlation was higher nest predation by generalist predators in fragmented forest landscapes. The effects of landscape composition on the breeding success of grouse were more marked in northern than in southern Finland, probably because predator populations are more food-regulated in the north. The diminished breeding success of forest grouse as a result of increased forest fragmentation is a probable cause of population declines in forest grouse species during the past decades in Fennoscandia.

Journal

EcologyEcological Society of America

Published: Jul 1, 2000

Keywords: Black Grouse; ; Capercaillie; ; Finland; ; forest fragmentation; ; Geographic Information Systems (GIS); ; landscape ecology; ; landscape structure; ; nest loss; ; predation; ; Tetrao tetrix ; Tetrao urogallus ; tetraonids

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off