CORRIDOR AND DISTANCE EFFECTS ON INTERPATCH MOVEMENTS: A LANDSCAPE EXPERIMENT WITH BUTTERFLIES

CORRIDOR AND DISTANCE EFFECTS ON INTERPATCH MOVEMENTS: A LANDSCAPE EXPERIMENT WITH BUTTERFLIES The hypothesis that corridors increase animal movement between habitat fragments, a central tenet of conservation biology, has been virtually untested. This study demonstrates that corridors increase interpatch movement rates of two butterfly species. The hypothesis was tested in a large-scale, replicated experiment, in which 27 equal-sized (1.64-ha) patches of early successional habitat were created within large areas of pine forest. Patches varied in whether or not they were connected to another patch by a corridor, and in their distance from other patches (64––384 m). The results of mark––release––recapture studies showed that two open-habitat butterfly species, Junonia coenia and Euptoieta claudia, moved more frequently between patches connected by corridors than between unconnected patches. Interpatch movement was significantly, negatively related to interpatch distance. Interpatch movement rates of J. coenia were significantly, positively related to the density of its host and nectar resource, Linaria canadensis. Corridor effects were stronger for males than for females and were most pronounced within three days after butterflies were marked. Pine forest was not a complete barrier to butterfly movement; both species moved between unconnected patches, even at the longest distances. However, the results of this study suggest that corridors will increase long-distance movements of habitat-restricted species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Applications Ecological Society of America

CORRIDOR AND DISTANCE EFFECTS ON INTERPATCH MOVEMENTS: A LANDSCAPE EXPERIMENT WITH BUTTERFLIES

Ecological Applications, Volume 9 (2) – May 1, 1999

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Publisher
Ecological Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the Ecological Society of America
Subject
Articles
ISSN
1051-0761
DOI
10.1890/1051-0761%281999%29009%5B0612:CADEOI%5D2.0.CO%3B2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The hypothesis that corridors increase animal movement between habitat fragments, a central tenet of conservation biology, has been virtually untested. This study demonstrates that corridors increase interpatch movement rates of two butterfly species. The hypothesis was tested in a large-scale, replicated experiment, in which 27 equal-sized (1.64-ha) patches of early successional habitat were created within large areas of pine forest. Patches varied in whether or not they were connected to another patch by a corridor, and in their distance from other patches (64––384 m). The results of mark––release––recapture studies showed that two open-habitat butterfly species, Junonia coenia and Euptoieta claudia, moved more frequently between patches connected by corridors than between unconnected patches. Interpatch movement was significantly, negatively related to interpatch distance. Interpatch movement rates of J. coenia were significantly, positively related to the density of its host and nectar resource, Linaria canadensis. Corridor effects were stronger for males than for females and were most pronounced within three days after butterflies were marked. Pine forest was not a complete barrier to butterfly movement; both species moved between unconnected patches, even at the longest distances. However, the results of this study suggest that corridors will increase long-distance movements of habitat-restricted species.

Journal

Ecological ApplicationsEcological Society of America

Published: May 1, 1999

Keywords: butterfly ; colonization ; conservation ; corridors ; dispersal ; Euptoieta claudia ; habitat fragmentation ; interpatch distance ; interpatch movement ; Junonia coenia ; landscape experiment

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