Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Writing the History of Women and Gender in Twentieth-Century Chile

Writing the History of Women and Gender in Twentieth-Century Chile Page 493 Thomas Miller Klubock hree historical moments have, I believe, shaped the recent boom in historical literature on women and gender in modern Chile. First, the experience of the socialist Unidad Popular (UP) government of Salvador Allende has been critical in several ways. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Chile attracted scholars with a commitment to social reform, socialism, and the revolutionary projects of the 1960s. Histories of peasants and workers sought to shed light on the processes that produced the Western Hemisphere’s only explicitly marxist labor movement and democratic transition to a socialist economy and state. These studies built on the foundations laid by Chilean marxist historians and social scientists who wrote groundbreaking studies of mine workers, the early labor movement, and leading figures in the Left, such as Emilio Recabarren and Elías Lafertte, founders of the Chilean Communist party.1 Both Chilean and North American historians located their social-historical focus on (male) workers and peasants, ignoring working-class women, questions of gender inequality, and women’s political activism. This emphasis reflected both Section photo: “Chilean Communist Party Meeting (ca. 1934).” Courtesy of Emperatriz Villarroel. 1. Among these works, see Hernán Ramírez Necochea, Historia del movimiento obrero: Antecedentes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hispanic American Historical Review Duke University Press

Writing the History of Women and Gender in Twentieth-Century Chile

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/writing-the-history-of-women-and-gender-in-twentieth-century-chile-e0LuuxdayD
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2168
eISSN
1527-1900
DOI
10.1215/00182168-81-3-4-493
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 493 Thomas Miller Klubock hree historical moments have, I believe, shaped the recent boom in historical literature on women and gender in modern Chile. First, the experience of the socialist Unidad Popular (UP) government of Salvador Allende has been critical in several ways. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Chile attracted scholars with a commitment to social reform, socialism, and the revolutionary projects of the 1960s. Histories of peasants and workers sought to shed light on the processes that produced the Western Hemisphere’s only explicitly marxist labor movement and democratic transition to a socialist economy and state. These studies built on the foundations laid by Chilean marxist historians and social scientists who wrote groundbreaking studies of mine workers, the early labor movement, and leading figures in the Left, such as Emilio Recabarren and Elías Lafertte, founders of the Chilean Communist party.1 Both Chilean and North American historians located their social-historical focus on (male) workers and peasants, ignoring working-class women, questions of gender inequality, and women’s political activism. This emphasis reflected both Section photo: “Chilean Communist Party Meeting (ca. 1934).” Courtesy of Emperatriz Villarroel. 1. Among these works, see Hernán Ramírez Necochea, Historia del movimiento obrero: Antecedentes

Journal

Hispanic American Historical ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Aug 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.