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Writing Program Administration and Faculty Professional Development: Which Faculty? What Development?

Writing Program Administration and Faculty Professional Development: Which Faculty? What... Writing Program Administration and Faculty Professional Development Which Faculty? What Development? Margaret K. Willard-Traub As at many other universities, I have local colleagues who view the teaching of writing as primarily a service function that can be accomplished apart from any particular disciplinary expertise. This perception is reinforced by the fact that most writing courses are taught by part-time faculty most often credentialed in fields other than composition and rhetoric and sometimes in fields other than English studies. In addition, the phrase “writing across the curriculum” at times has an unusual, institutional valence — one which leads to activities thus labeled being viewed by some not as invitations to collaborate on the joint project of developing students’ language use in diverse contexts, but rather as cloaked abdications by the writing program of its primary responsibility for preparing students to write in the disciplines. Given this context, the likelihood that collaboration and mutual learning would occur between writing program faculty and faculty from other disciplines — much less the likelihood of learning that would increase the critical consciousness of both — could be seen as, at best, minimal. Yet because my primary concerns as an administrator are both writing-across-the-curriculum http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture Duke University Press

Writing Program Administration and Faculty Professional Development: Which Faculty? What Development?

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2008 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1531-4200
DOI
10.1215/15314200-2008-004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Writing Program Administration and Faculty Professional Development Which Faculty? What Development? Margaret K. Willard-Traub As at many other universities, I have local colleagues who view the teaching of writing as primarily a service function that can be accomplished apart from any particular disciplinary expertise. This perception is reinforced by the fact that most writing courses are taught by part-time faculty most often credentialed in fields other than composition and rhetoric and sometimes in fields other than English studies. In addition, the phrase “writing across the curriculum” at times has an unusual, institutional valence — one which leads to activities thus labeled being viewed by some not as invitations to collaborate on the joint project of developing students’ language use in diverse contexts, but rather as cloaked abdications by the writing program of its primary responsibility for preparing students to write in the disciplines. Given this context, the likelihood that collaboration and mutual learning would occur between writing program faculty and faculty from other disciplines — much less the likelihood of learning that would increase the critical consciousness of both — could be seen as, at best, minimal. Yet because my primary concerns as an administrator are both writing-across-the-curriculum

Journal

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2008

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