Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Writing into a Void: REPRESENTING SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN THE NARRATIVE OF COLONIAL SPANISH AMERICA

Writing into a Void: REPRESENTING SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN THE NARRATIVE OF COLONIAL SPANISH AMERICA Herman L. Bennett Social Text 93, Vol. 25, No. 4, Winter 2007 DOI 10.1215/01642472-2007-012 © 2007 Duke University Press Representations of blackness invariably locate the focus on the exteriority of the slave’s experience at the expense of any serious examination of slave life and culture — not to speak of black gender norms and sexuality. World slavery, which writers, then and now, configured as the source of the black experience. In the modern imagination, the black figure still conjures up slavery. Slavery invokes images of structural continuity and cultural stasis. Despite the recent emphasis in the Anglophone world on process, dynamism, and contingency — temporal, spatial, and juridical — such methodological interventions, though a more fundamental part of Latin American knowledge production, have yet to transform the conceptual approach to slavery. Especially in Spanish America, the emphasis on structural transformation invariably routed through variants of Marxism and positivist liberal-economic thought confines the discussion on human bondage to the social logic of master-slave relationships and the institutional manifestations (feudalist, capitalist, and so on) of a particular slave regime.6 Intent notwithstanding, this quest magnifies structuralism’s hold over social theories informing the study of Spanish American slave societies and the cultures http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Writing into a Void: REPRESENTING SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN THE NARRATIVE OF COLONIAL SPANISH AMERICA

Social Text , Volume 25 (4 93) – Dec 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/writing-into-a-void-representing-slavery-and-freedom-in-the-narrative-zBcD9ZRQP0
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-2007-012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Herman L. Bennett Social Text 93, Vol. 25, No. 4, Winter 2007 DOI 10.1215/01642472-2007-012 © 2007 Duke University Press Representations of blackness invariably locate the focus on the exteriority of the slave’s experience at the expense of any serious examination of slave life and culture — not to speak of black gender norms and sexuality. World slavery, which writers, then and now, configured as the source of the black experience. In the modern imagination, the black figure still conjures up slavery. Slavery invokes images of structural continuity and cultural stasis. Despite the recent emphasis in the Anglophone world on process, dynamism, and contingency — temporal, spatial, and juridical — such methodological interventions, though a more fundamental part of Latin American knowledge production, have yet to transform the conceptual approach to slavery. Especially in Spanish America, the emphasis on structural transformation invariably routed through variants of Marxism and positivist liberal-economic thought confines the discussion on human bondage to the social logic of master-slave relationships and the institutional manifestations (feudalist, capitalist, and so on) of a particular slave regime.6 Intent notwithstanding, this quest magnifies structuralism’s hold over social theories informing the study of Spanish American slave societies and the cultures

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.