Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Women, Boys, and the Paradigm of Athenian Pederasty

Women, Boys, and the Paradigm of Athenian Pederasty [For when we ourselves collaborate with our wives in their misbehavior and teach them to be licentious (truphan), such are the plots that sprout from them.] The proboulos gives as an example a husband who summons a jeweller to fix his wife’s necklace on an evening when he himself is away and asks him to adjust the peg in the aperture (line 413). The double entendre is not subtle. It is the proboulos’s second example, however, that interests me in the present context. heteros de tis pros skutotomon tadi legei neanian kai peos ekhont’ ou paidikon. (414–15) [And this is what another man says to a shoemaker, a youngster (neanias) who has a penis that’s not boyish (paidikon).] The joke that follows is somewhat obscure, but I wish to concentrate here on the description of the potential seducer of a citizen’s wife. He is a youth [neanias], but, despite his years and, presumably, his boyish appearance, his penis is not that of a child [pais]. Part of the husband’s mistake is to imagine that the youth is not a threat because he is still only a boy and hence not ready for an active role in sex; implicit http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies Duke University Press

Women, Boys, and the Paradigm of Athenian Pederasty

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/women-boys-and-the-paradigm-of-athenian-pederasty-BhQIROavTP

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Brown University and differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies
ISSN
1040-7391
eISSN
1527-1986
DOI
10.1215/10407391-13-2-35
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

[For when we ourselves collaborate with our wives in their misbehavior and teach them to be licentious (truphan), such are the plots that sprout from them.] The proboulos gives as an example a husband who summons a jeweller to fix his wife’s necklace on an evening when he himself is away and asks him to adjust the peg in the aperture (line 413). The double entendre is not subtle. It is the proboulos’s second example, however, that interests me in the present context. heteros de tis pros skutotomon tadi legei neanian kai peos ekhont’ ou paidikon. (414–15) [And this is what another man says to a shoemaker, a youngster (neanias) who has a penis that’s not boyish (paidikon).] The joke that follows is somewhat obscure, but I wish to concentrate here on the description of the potential seducer of a citizen’s wife. He is a youth [neanias], but, despite his years and, presumably, his boyish appearance, his penis is not that of a child [pais]. Part of the husband’s mistake is to imagine that the youth is not a threat because he is still only a boy and hence not ready for an active role in sex; implicit

Journal

differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.