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William Faulkner: The Making of a Modernist

William Faulkner: The Making of a Modernist American Literature nomena from the early 1500s to the mid-1800s. Perhaps most stunning among this collection’s contributions, however, are the creative ways in which many of the essayists pay attention to nonverbal cultural records in their attempts to unravel past meanings. Essays in this volume examine such diverse phenomena as courtroom oratorical practices, performed dramas, paintings by Benjamin West and John Singleton Copley, penitentiary floor plans, religious artifacts, and Native American preaching practices. My only complaint with this collection is that I found myself wanting to know more about how the respondents in the original conference felt about these works. Short sections of commentary after each essay would have accented the already tantalizingly thick way in which these scholars have sought to make sense of the past and various tellings of the past. This is a collection that will richly reward the reading of a wide range of scholars, particularly those interested in postcolonial and interdisciplinary studies—whether those studies be concerned with the early Americas or not. Paul Gutjahr, Indiana University Republic of Letters: The American Intellectual Community, 1775–1865. By Gilman M. Ostrander. Madison, Wisc.: Madison House. 1999. xvi, 379 pp. $35.95. In a letter written during the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Literature Duke University Press

William Faulkner: The Making of a Modernist

American Literature , Volume 73 (1) – Mar 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0002-9831
eISSN
1527-2117
DOI
10.1215/00029831-73-1-203
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Literature nomena from the early 1500s to the mid-1800s. Perhaps most stunning among this collection’s contributions, however, are the creative ways in which many of the essayists pay attention to nonverbal cultural records in their attempts to unravel past meanings. Essays in this volume examine such diverse phenomena as courtroom oratorical practices, performed dramas, paintings by Benjamin West and John Singleton Copley, penitentiary floor plans, religious artifacts, and Native American preaching practices. My only complaint with this collection is that I found myself wanting to know more about how the respondents in the original conference felt about these works. Short sections of commentary after each essay would have accented the already tantalizingly thick way in which these scholars have sought to make sense of the past and various tellings of the past. This is a collection that will richly reward the reading of a wide range of scholars, particularly those interested in postcolonial and interdisciplinary studies—whether those studies be concerned with the early Americas or not. Paul Gutjahr, Indiana University Republic of Letters: The American Intellectual Community, 1775–1865. By Gilman M. Ostrander. Madison, Wisc.: Madison House. 1999. xvi, 379 pp. $35.95. In a letter written during the

Journal

American LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2001

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