Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Why Didn't Hayek Review Keynes's General Theory? A Partial Answer

Why Didn't Hayek Review Keynes's General Theory? A Partial Answer before Robbins had his famous row with Keynes in the Committee of Economists of the Economic Advisory Council in the autumn of 1930.)1 In a matter of months the two men were colleagues and close friends who saw each other every day both at the School and in their homes. While Hayek was a visiting professor he rented a house in the next street to Robbins’s in Hampstead Garden Suburb; when he became the Tooke Professor he moved to another house a few yards away. As Caldwell points out, Hayek’s moves from Vienna to London and from London to America also mean there are very few surviving letters to Hayek from his other friends in the 1930s. The correspondence in the Hayek Papers (in the Hoover Institution at Stanford University) with Ludwig von Mises and Karl Popper, for instance, is extensive but begins only in 1938–39. However, letters from Hayek written in the 1930s to friends who moved to the States before he did do survive. In search of LSE gossip I have read some of these letters to Fritz Machlup and Gottfried Haberler, both of whose papers are now in the archives of the Hoover Institution at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

Why Didn't Hayek Review Keynes's General Theory? A Partial Answer

History of Political Economy , Volume 33 (2) – Jun 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/why-didn-t-hayek-review-keynes-s-general-theory-a-partial-answer-JnzGQyG22Q
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-33-2-369
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

before Robbins had his famous row with Keynes in the Committee of Economists of the Economic Advisory Council in the autumn of 1930.)1 In a matter of months the two men were colleagues and close friends who saw each other every day both at the School and in their homes. While Hayek was a visiting professor he rented a house in the next street to Robbins’s in Hampstead Garden Suburb; when he became the Tooke Professor he moved to another house a few yards away. As Caldwell points out, Hayek’s moves from Vienna to London and from London to America also mean there are very few surviving letters to Hayek from his other friends in the 1930s. The correspondence in the Hayek Papers (in the Hoover Institution at Stanford University) with Ludwig von Mises and Karl Popper, for instance, is extensive but begins only in 1938–39. However, letters from Hayek written in the 1930s to friends who moved to the States before he did do survive. In search of LSE gossip I have read some of these letters to Fritz Machlup and Gottfried Haberler, both of whose papers are now in the archives of the Hoover Institution at

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.