Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

What Makes Things Cheesy?: SATIRE, MULTINATIONALISM, AND B-MOVIES

What Makes Things Cheesy?: SATIRE, MULTINATIONALISM, AND B-MOVIES Page 59 What Makes Things Cheesy? S AT I R E , M U LT I N AT I O N A L I S M , A N D B - M O V I E S The secret of life, in one cliché, if I may sum it up for you, is: ENJOY, EVEN IF YOU’RE NOT ENJOYING. —Howard Stern Annalee Newitz From Camp to Cheese A new kind of humor is haunting U.S. popular culture. Critics and consumers have dubbed it “cheese.” Yet we have no formal definitions of the term, only textual associations. Reruns of The Brady Bunch and Mork and Mindy are cheesy. Blaxploitation is cheesy, as are Mexican horror movies and gore flicks in the tradition of Herschell Gordon Lewis. Godzilla is cheesy; Bruce Lee and nearly all Kung Fu movies are cheesy; John Woo is sometimes cheesy; and Quentin Tarantino is the auteur of cheese. Clothing and music from the 1970s are cheesy; and the 1980s are quickly becoming cheesy too, especially New Wave music and John Hughes movies. There is deliberate cheese (The Brady Bunch Movie) and cheesy consumption (watching Shaft [1971] just to hear a black guy say, “Right http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

What Makes Things Cheesy?: SATIRE, MULTINATIONALISM, AND B-MOVIES

Social Text , Volume 18 (2 63) – Jun 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/what-makes-things-cheesy-satire-multinationalism-and-b-movies-rXd7PX00gl
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-18-2_63-59
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 59 What Makes Things Cheesy? S AT I R E , M U LT I N AT I O N A L I S M , A N D B - M O V I E S The secret of life, in one cliché, if I may sum it up for you, is: ENJOY, EVEN IF YOU’RE NOT ENJOYING. —Howard Stern Annalee Newitz From Camp to Cheese A new kind of humor is haunting U.S. popular culture. Critics and consumers have dubbed it “cheese.” Yet we have no formal definitions of the term, only textual associations. Reruns of The Brady Bunch and Mork and Mindy are cheesy. Blaxploitation is cheesy, as are Mexican horror movies and gore flicks in the tradition of Herschell Gordon Lewis. Godzilla is cheesy; Bruce Lee and nearly all Kung Fu movies are cheesy; John Woo is sometimes cheesy; and Quentin Tarantino is the auteur of cheese. Clothing and music from the 1970s are cheesy; and the 1980s are quickly becoming cheesy too, especially New Wave music and John Hughes movies. There is deliberate cheese (The Brady Bunch Movie) and cheesy consumption (watching Shaft [1971] just to hear a black guy say, “Right

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.