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Weeping for Dido: The Classics in the Medieval Classroom by Marjorie Curry Woods

Weeping for Dido: The Classics in the Medieval Classroom by Marjorie Curry Woods Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/27/1/118/867420/0270118.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 30 March 2022 il Penseroso ed il Moderato (1988). In beautifully visualized analyses, Chaganti’s exploratory and original comparisons induce speculative thinking that elucidates both the medieval texts (in all their puzzling and often incomplete verbal ges - tures) and these two classics of modern choreography. A dance of death, set as a mural in a charnel house built to cope with the sudden onslaught of thousands of corpses from plague infourteenth- century London, has a grim aptness (like so much medieval writing) to our current time. Chaganti’s lightfooted commentary stages a double, or even triple, act in which Childs’s 1979 performance, reproduced in Sol LeWitt’s 2009 retrospective as a flickering screened accompaniment to the live dance, is itself the backcloth for the “agile gesticulating skeletons” of the ghastly wall paintings to which Lydgate’s text was attached. We see the medieval g fi ures through the gauze of film, dance, and the ghostly white wraps of Childs’s 1979 moving dancers, caught in overlaid visions of past and present. It is a key instance for Chaganti of the virtuality of dance, of the strange interstices and proleptic space in which a spectator learns http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

Weeping for Dido: The Classics in the Medieval Classroom by Marjorie Curry Woods

Common Knowledge , Volume 27 (1) – Jan 1, 2021

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Copyright
Copyright © 2021 Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754x-8723238
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/27/1/118/867420/0270118.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 30 March 2022 il Penseroso ed il Moderato (1988). In beautifully visualized analyses, Chaganti’s exploratory and original comparisons induce speculative thinking that elucidates both the medieval texts (in all their puzzling and often incomplete verbal ges - tures) and these two classics of modern choreography. A dance of death, set as a mural in a charnel house built to cope with the sudden onslaught of thousands of corpses from plague infourteenth- century London, has a grim aptness (like so much medieval writing) to our current time. Chaganti’s lightfooted commentary stages a double, or even triple, act in which Childs’s 1979 performance, reproduced in Sol LeWitt’s 2009 retrospective as a flickering screened accompaniment to the live dance, is itself the backcloth for the “agile gesticulating skeletons” of the ghastly wall paintings to which Lydgate’s text was attached. We see the medieval g fi ures through the gauze of film, dance, and the ghostly white wraps of Childs’s 1979 moving dancers, caught in overlaid visions of past and present. It is a key instance for Chaganti of the virtuality of dance, of the strange interstices and proleptic space in which a spectator learns

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2021

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