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Wedding Citizenship and Culture: KOREAN ADOPTEES AND THE GLOBAL FAMILY OF KOREA

Wedding Citizenship and Culture: KOREAN ADOPTEES AND THE GLOBAL FAMILY OF KOREA Social Text 74, Vol. 21, No. 1, Spring 2003. Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press. Eleana Kim from sixteen to thirty-four and hailing from North America, Europe, and Australia, participated. On this day, perhaps aggravated by the heat, frustrations had mounted, and the presence of the media only made things worse. Later, some complained to me that they felt like “animals in a zoo,” made a spectacle of as they were transported from location to location on what one adoptee called “the orphan bus,” emblazoned with a banner that read “2001 Summer Cultural Awareness Training Program for Overseas Adopted Koreans” [kukoe ibyang tongp’o moguk munhwa yeonsu] in Korean and English. I begin this article with a story from the 2001 OKF summer program to suggest how the attempts and gestures of the South Korean state to grant “Koreanness” to overseas Korean adoptees come into conflict with the desires and experiences of adopted Koreans themselves.3 The OKF program was in many ways an attempt to wed Korean adoptees to “Korea,”4 an invitation to the “motherland” so that they might, as offered by the president of OKF, “begin to feel the breath of Korea’s rich culture.” The OKF program http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Wedding Citizenship and Culture: KOREAN ADOPTEES AND THE GLOBAL FAMILY OF KOREA

Social Text , Volume 21 (1 74) – Mar 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-21-1_74-57
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social Text 74, Vol. 21, No. 1, Spring 2003. Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press. Eleana Kim from sixteen to thirty-four and hailing from North America, Europe, and Australia, participated. On this day, perhaps aggravated by the heat, frustrations had mounted, and the presence of the media only made things worse. Later, some complained to me that they felt like “animals in a zoo,” made a spectacle of as they were transported from location to location on what one adoptee called “the orphan bus,” emblazoned with a banner that read “2001 Summer Cultural Awareness Training Program for Overseas Adopted Koreans” [kukoe ibyang tongp’o moguk munhwa yeonsu] in Korean and English. I begin this article with a story from the 2001 OKF summer program to suggest how the attempts and gestures of the South Korean state to grant “Koreanness” to overseas Korean adoptees come into conflict with the desires and experiences of adopted Koreans themselves.3 The OKF program was in many ways an attempt to wed Korean adoptees to “Korea,”4 an invitation to the “motherland” so that they might, as offered by the president of OKF, “begin to feel the breath of Korea’s rich culture.” The OKF program

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2003

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