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Violence and Terrorism: Feminist Observations on Islamist Movements, State, and the International System

Violence and Terrorism: Feminist Observations on Islamist Movements, State, and the International... reflected the difficult transition to modernity underway in the region and the conflict between traditional and modern norms, relations, and institutions. Moreover, in common with radical movements elsewhere in the developing world, Islamist movements grew from political and economic dysfunction, insecurity, and alienation. In particular, we may identify several factors in their emergence. National and global economic factors loom large in the causes of religio-political revolts. These include distorted development, the unrealized promise of national development, and the persistence or growth of domestic and international inequalities. Some fundamentalist movements (e.g., in Iran, Egypt, and Algeria) have targeted both their own nation-states and the world capitalist order as sources of injustice—and claimed that the solution would be an Islamic order.4 Disparities and inequalities within countries have been associated with corruption or declining oil revenues or misguided resource allocation priorities (such as huge military purchases). They also resulted from the austerities that accompanied the adoption of structural adjustment policies. It should be noted that political Islam emerged as the global political economy shifted from Keynesian to neoliberal, and it followed the collapse of talks on a new international economic order (NIEO). Salient political factors include authoritarian rule, the absence of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

Violence and Terrorism: Feminist Observations on Islamist Movements, State, and the International System

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1548-226X
DOI
10.1215/1089201X-21-1-2-125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

reflected the difficult transition to modernity underway in the region and the conflict between traditional and modern norms, relations, and institutions. Moreover, in common with radical movements elsewhere in the developing world, Islamist movements grew from political and economic dysfunction, insecurity, and alienation. In particular, we may identify several factors in their emergence. National and global economic factors loom large in the causes of religio-political revolts. These include distorted development, the unrealized promise of national development, and the persistence or growth of domestic and international inequalities. Some fundamentalist movements (e.g., in Iran, Egypt, and Algeria) have targeted both their own nation-states and the world capitalist order as sources of injustice—and claimed that the solution would be an Islamic order.4 Disparities and inequalities within countries have been associated with corruption or declining oil revenues or misguided resource allocation priorities (such as huge military purchases). They also resulted from the austerities that accompanied the adoption of structural adjustment policies. It should be noted that political Islam emerged as the global political economy shifted from Keynesian to neoliberal, and it followed the collapse of talks on a new international economic order (NIEO). Salient political factors include authoritarian rule, the absence of

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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