Villains, Victims, or Makonde in the Making? Reading the Explorer Henry O'Neill and Listening to the Headman Lishehe

Villains, Victims, or Makonde in the Making? Reading the Explorer Henry O'Neill and Listening to... Villains, Victims, or Makonde in the Making? Reading the Explorer Henry O'Neill and Listening to the Headman Lishehe -- West 51 (1): 1 -- Ethnohistory QUICK SEARCH: (advanced) Author: Keyword(s): Year: Vol: Page: Home | Help | Feedback | Subscriptions | Archive | Search | Table of Contents Institution: DEEPDYVE INC | Sign In via User Name/Password Ethnohistory 2004 51(1):1-43; DOI:10.1215/00141801-51-1-1 This Article Full Text (PDF) References Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Services Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Alert me to new issues of the journal Download to citation manager Citing Articles Citing Articles via Web of Science (1) Citing Articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by West, H. G. Search for Related Content Social Bookmarking What's this? Duke University Press Articles Villains, Victims, or Makonde in the Making? Reading the Explorer Henry O'Neill and Listening to the Headman Lishehe Harry G. West SOAS , University of London Abstract. Henry O'Neill's narrative of first encounter in 1882 with residents of the plateau south of the Rovuma (in Mozambique) constitutes the earliest contribution to the written record on the area. By his presence among and accounts of these people, O'Neill transformed regional villains into victims awaiting British stewardship. This article portrays those O'Neill met on the plateau as more complex historical subjects who brought to the encounter their own fears, aspirations, and strategic agendas. Whereas the writings of the Subaltern Studies Group provide the author with a useful point of departure, the article critiques Subaltern Studies' excessive focus on textual readings, turning instead to the accounts of contemporary descendants of history's silenced subjects to construct an alternative narrative. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnohistory Duke University Press

Villains, Victims, or Makonde in the Making? Reading the Explorer Henry O'Neill and Listening to the Headman Lishehe

Ethnohistory, Volume 51 (1) – Jan 1, 2004

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Duke University Press
ISSN
0014-1801
eISSN
1527-5477
D.O.I.
10.1215/00141801-51-1-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Villains, Victims, or Makonde in the Making? Reading the Explorer Henry O'Neill and Listening to the Headman Lishehe -- West 51 (1): 1 -- Ethnohistory QUICK SEARCH: (advanced) Author: Keyword(s): Year: Vol: Page: Home | Help | Feedback | Subscriptions | Archive | Search | Table of Contents Institution: DEEPDYVE INC | Sign In via User Name/Password Ethnohistory 2004 51(1):1-43; DOI:10.1215/00141801-51-1-1 This Article Full Text (PDF) References Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Services Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Alert me to new issues of the journal Download to citation manager Citing Articles Citing Articles via Web of Science (1) Citing Articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by West, H. G. Search for Related Content Social Bookmarking What's this? Duke University Press Articles Villains, Victims, or Makonde in the Making? Reading the Explorer Henry O'Neill and Listening to the Headman Lishehe Harry G. West SOAS , University of London Abstract. Henry O'Neill's narrative of first encounter in 1882 with residents of the plateau south of the Rovuma (in Mozambique) constitutes the earliest contribution to the written record on the area. By his presence among and accounts of these people, O'Neill transformed regional villains into victims awaiting British stewardship. This article portrays those O'Neill met on the plateau as more complex historical subjects who brought to the encounter their own fears, aspirations, and strategic agendas. Whereas the writings of the Subaltern Studies Group provide the author with a useful point of departure, the article critiques Subaltern Studies' excessive focus on textual readings, turning instead to the accounts of contemporary descendants of history's silenced subjects to construct an alternative narrative.

Journal

EthnohistoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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