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Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas

Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas MLQ ƒ March 2002 gives Americans the capacity to play out their role as unwilling (or at best deeply ambivalent) participants in another’s enterprise” (6). For example, Greene cites the requerimiento, a declaration of intent to conquer that the Spanish conquistadors read to the Indians at first encounters for the express purpose of obtaining their peaceable acquiescence to subjugation.1 Perhaps Greene’s most debatable idea is that Petrarchism also served as a vehicle for contestation, that is, a means of articulating the Indians’ resistance to conquest. Ultimately, Unrequited Conquests studies a process of cultural transformation focused on Europe. Greene describes it as the “anacultural” dimension of Petrarchan discourse in the sixteenth century: European poets of this period adopt ideologemes that express their urge to have it both ways: they want to maintain their privileged, culturally particular standpoints, but also to step away from those standpoints and experience otherness, in their lovers or themselves. They want to produce a lyric poetry that responds to traditional classical and vernacular models but also acknowledges contemporary forms of difference. Poems of this sort often test the scrim of lyric subjectivity in their quest for otherness, but their speakers do not become other to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary History Duke University Press

Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by University of Washington
ISSN
0026-7929
eISSN
1527-1943
DOI
10.1215/00267929-63-1-119
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MLQ ƒ March 2002 gives Americans the capacity to play out their role as unwilling (or at best deeply ambivalent) participants in another’s enterprise” (6). For example, Greene cites the requerimiento, a declaration of intent to conquer that the Spanish conquistadors read to the Indians at first encounters for the express purpose of obtaining their peaceable acquiescence to subjugation.1 Perhaps Greene’s most debatable idea is that Petrarchism also served as a vehicle for contestation, that is, a means of articulating the Indians’ resistance to conquest. Ultimately, Unrequited Conquests studies a process of cultural transformation focused on Europe. Greene describes it as the “anacultural” dimension of Petrarchan discourse in the sixteenth century: European poets of this period adopt ideologemes that express their urge to have it both ways: they want to maintain their privileged, culturally particular standpoints, but also to step away from those standpoints and experience otherness, in their lovers or themselves. They want to produce a lyric poetry that responds to traditional classical and vernacular models but also acknowledges contemporary forms of difference. Poems of this sort often test the scrim of lyric subjectivity in their quest for otherness, but their speakers do not become other to

Journal

Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary HistoryDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2002

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