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UN-REMEMBERING MONIQUE WITTIG

UN-REMEMBERING MONIQUE WITTIG Robyn Wiegman one f the demeanor of a public voice is set in large part by the genre in which one is called to speech, then I can only begin by confessing that I do not fulfill here what memorialization might most seem to offer. This is odd, no doubt, because I did indeed accept an invitation to remember the contributions of Monique Wittig, and I did promise to consider the implications for the critical present of what her absence might come, now, to speak. But as you will soon see, I have faltered on some of the less noble implications of memorialization, and I have grown increasingly disoriented by the disjuncture between the ongoing force of our own outliving and the necessary break — the insistent interruption — that the proper acknowledgment of loss necessitates. To be sure, I did go looking for Monique Wittig, and there are clear signs that many of the issues that have stopped me in my tracks are ones absolutely germane to her political theory and fictional worlds. She was, after all, consistently enthralled by the dissonance between the struggle to diagnose the incipient violences of her own political present and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies Duke University Press

UN-REMEMBERING MONIQUE WITTIG

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1064-2684
eISSN
1064-2684
DOI
10.1215/10642684-2007-005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Robyn Wiegman one f the demeanor of a public voice is set in large part by the genre in which one is called to speech, then I can only begin by confessing that I do not fulfill here what memorialization might most seem to offer. This is odd, no doubt, because I did indeed accept an invitation to remember the contributions of Monique Wittig, and I did promise to consider the implications for the critical present of what her absence might come, now, to speak. But as you will soon see, I have faltered on some of the less noble implications of memorialization, and I have grown increasingly disoriented by the disjuncture between the ongoing force of our own outliving and the necessary break — the insistent interruption — that the proper acknowledgment of loss necessitates. To be sure, I did go looking for Monique Wittig, and there are clear signs that many of the issues that have stopped me in my tracks are ones absolutely germane to her political theory and fictional worlds. She was, after all, consistently enthralled by the dissonance between the struggle to diagnose the incipient violences of her own political present and the

Journal

GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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