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TRACING NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGE HISTORY THROUGH CONSONANT CLUSTER REDUCTION: THE CASE OF LUMBEE ENGLISH

TRACING NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGE HISTORY THROUGH CONSONANT CLUSTER REDUCTION: THE CASE OF LUMBEE... american speech 76.4 (2001) ronments do, with prepausal environments falling in between. This gradation is intuitively plausible, as fully articulated preconsonantal clusters necessarily involve the production of three or more consonant sounds consecutively—quite difficult for English speakers to articulate. The phonetic composition of the cluster affects variability as well; clusters in which the first segment is a nasal are most likely to be reduced, followed by laterals, sibilants, and stops. Morphologically, reduction takes place in monomorphemic environments (ol’ for old) more often than bimorphemic environments created through suffixation (walk’ for walked), while a third category of clusters, characterized by word-internal vowel change and redundant suffixation (kep’ for kept), falls in the middle. Logically, bimorphemic clusters would be less likely candidates for reduction, because they have a greater functional load than monomorphemic clusters. Prosodically, clusters in unstressed syllables are more prone to reduction than those in stressed syllables. The following is a summary of these internal constraints, synthesized from various sources and taken from Wolfram, Childs, and Torbert (2000) (CCR decreases from left to right): Following context preobstruent > presonorant > prevocalic (e.g., [bEs kId] ‘best kid’ > [bEs nem] ‘best name’ > [bEs át] ‘best at’) Preceding context http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

TRACING NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGE HISTORY THROUGH CONSONANT CLUSTER REDUCTION: THE CASE OF LUMBEE ENGLISH

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-76-4-361
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

american speech 76.4 (2001) ronments do, with prepausal environments falling in between. This gradation is intuitively plausible, as fully articulated preconsonantal clusters necessarily involve the production of three or more consonant sounds consecutively—quite difficult for English speakers to articulate. The phonetic composition of the cluster affects variability as well; clusters in which the first segment is a nasal are most likely to be reduced, followed by laterals, sibilants, and stops. Morphologically, reduction takes place in monomorphemic environments (ol’ for old) more often than bimorphemic environments created through suffixation (walk’ for walked), while a third category of clusters, characterized by word-internal vowel change and redundant suffixation (kep’ for kept), falls in the middle. Logically, bimorphemic clusters would be less likely candidates for reduction, because they have a greater functional load than monomorphemic clusters. Prosodically, clusters in unstressed syllables are more prone to reduction than those in stressed syllables. The following is a summary of these internal constraints, synthesized from various sources and taken from Wolfram, Childs, and Torbert (2000) (CCR decreases from left to right): Following context preobstruent > presonorant > prevocalic (e.g., [bEs kId] ‘best kid’ > [bEs nem] ‘best name’ > [bEs át] ‘best at’) Preceding context

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2001

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