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Towards an Ethics of Transnational Encounter, or "When" Does a "Chinese" Woman Become a "Feminist"?

Towards an Ethics of Transnational Encounter, or "When" Does a "Chinese" Woman Become a "Feminist"? d i f f e r e n c e s These two narratives seem to fall within two unrelated categories as objects of academic inquiry: the former belongs with questions of assimilation and multiculturalism in ethnic and diaspora studies; the latter raises questions of cross-cultural encounter and conflict in studies of First/Third World feminisms. The former may be construed as a domestic issue belonging to immigration studies or minority studies, since the author of the autobiography, Anchee Min, had clear intentions to stay in the U.S. and has since become a U.S. citizen; the latter may appear as an international topic, since the scholar Li Xiaojiang never intended to stay in the U.S. 2 The main factor weighing in such a conventional academic categorization, it seems, lies in the intentions and the different durations of their stays, where one is construed as immigration and the other as travel. What complicates this neat distinction between immigration and travel, as is evident in the uneasy way in which the “sojourner mentality” of early Chinese laborers in the U.S. is dealt with in Asian American historiography, 3 is that the intention to stay and the duration of the stay are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies Duke University Press

Towards an Ethics of Transnational Encounter, or "When" Does a "Chinese" Woman Become a "Feminist"?

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Brown University and differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies
ISSN
1040-7391
eISSN
1527-1986
DOI
10.1215/10407391-13-2-90
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

d i f f e r e n c e s These two narratives seem to fall within two unrelated categories as objects of academic inquiry: the former belongs with questions of assimilation and multiculturalism in ethnic and diaspora studies; the latter raises questions of cross-cultural encounter and conflict in studies of First/Third World feminisms. The former may be construed as a domestic issue belonging to immigration studies or minority studies, since the author of the autobiography, Anchee Min, had clear intentions to stay in the U.S. and has since become a U.S. citizen; the latter may appear as an international topic, since the scholar Li Xiaojiang never intended to stay in the U.S. 2 The main factor weighing in such a conventional academic categorization, it seems, lies in the intentions and the different durations of their stays, where one is construed as immigration and the other as travel. What complicates this neat distinction between immigration and travel, as is evident in the uneasy way in which the “sojourner mentality” of early Chinese laborers in the U.S. is dealt with in Asian American historiography, 3 is that the intention to stay and the duration of the stay are

Journal

differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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