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THIRD PERSON PLURAL PRESENT TENSE MARKERS IN LONDON PRISONERS' DEPOSITIONS, 1562-1623

THIRD PERSON PLURAL PRESENT TENSE MARKERS IN LONDON PRISONERS' DEPOSITIONS, 1562-1623 PREVIOUS DISCUSSIONS The main recent works dealing with this constraint in Early Modern English are Schendl’s (1996; 2000). He outlines (1996, 148) previous work on what has been termed the “personal pronoun rule” and “the Northern paradigm” (McIntosh 1983, 117–18); “the NP/PRO Constraint” (Bailey, Maynor, and Cukor-Avila 1989, 294); the “Northern Present-Tense Rule” (Montgomery 1994, 83); “the Subject Type Constraint and Proximity to American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 3, Fall 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society Third Person Plural Present Tense Markers Subject Constraint” (Montgomery, Fuller, and DeMarse 1993, 337); and “the Northern Subject Rule” (Ihalainen 1994, 221). Most of these studies look at plural verb morphology across the three persons. In this paper I concentrate on the third person plural only, and so I am using the phrase they-constraint, partly as a mnemonic, and partly because I want to avoid geographical and temporal categorization, as the construction has spread southwards and overseas and has lasted for many centuries. they-constraint in late middle english. According to McIntosh (1983, 117–18), the late Middle English distribution of third person plural present tense indicative markers was -es in the North, unless the word they was adjacent, in which http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

THIRD PERSON PLURAL PRESENT TENSE MARKERS IN LONDON PRISONERS' DEPOSITIONS, 1562-1623

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-77-3-242
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PREVIOUS DISCUSSIONS The main recent works dealing with this constraint in Early Modern English are Schendl’s (1996; 2000). He outlines (1996, 148) previous work on what has been termed the “personal pronoun rule” and “the Northern paradigm” (McIntosh 1983, 117–18); “the NP/PRO Constraint” (Bailey, Maynor, and Cukor-Avila 1989, 294); the “Northern Present-Tense Rule” (Montgomery 1994, 83); “the Subject Type Constraint and Proximity to American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 3, Fall 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society Third Person Plural Present Tense Markers Subject Constraint” (Montgomery, Fuller, and DeMarse 1993, 337); and “the Northern Subject Rule” (Ihalainen 1994, 221). Most of these studies look at plural verb morphology across the three persons. In this paper I concentrate on the third person plural only, and so I am using the phrase they-constraint, partly as a mnemonic, and partly because I want to avoid geographical and temporal categorization, as the construction has spread southwards and overseas and has lasted for many centuries. they-constraint in late middle english. According to McIntosh (1983, 117–18), the late Middle English distribution of third person plural present tense indicative markers was -es in the North, unless the word they was adjacent, in which

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

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