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The World Bank: Its First Half Century

The World Bank: Its First Half Century in the United States and Japan are examined, along with the relationship of the Bank to its Bretton Woods twin, the International Monetary Fund. The editors recognize with regret that one of the latter-day features of the Bank’s activities is not represented in this voluminous assemblage of case studies. The fall of the Berlin Wall has been too recent to permit systematic scholarly inquiry into the Bank’s relations with countries in Eastern Europe and in the former Soviet Union. Altogether there are some eighteen contributors to nearly 2,000 pages of rather dense text. This format self-evidently assures a healthy pluralism. But it also means that what we have here is not exactly a conventional institutional history: the presentation, for example, lacks a continuous chronological story line. The multipleauthor approach also means that there is a fair amount of repetition in the various narratives. Even so, the editors should be congratulated for allocating space for the views of a substantial number of the Bank’s critics. A project that puts the critiques prominently on the record — and which thus facilitates serious appraisal of their respective strengths and weaknesses — should be welcomed as the Bank proceeds to rethink its http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

The World Bank: Its First Half Century

History of Political Economy , Volume 32 (2) – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-32-2-395
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

in the United States and Japan are examined, along with the relationship of the Bank to its Bretton Woods twin, the International Monetary Fund. The editors recognize with regret that one of the latter-day features of the Bank’s activities is not represented in this voluminous assemblage of case studies. The fall of the Berlin Wall has been too recent to permit systematic scholarly inquiry into the Bank’s relations with countries in Eastern Europe and in the former Soviet Union. Altogether there are some eighteen contributors to nearly 2,000 pages of rather dense text. This format self-evidently assures a healthy pluralism. But it also means that what we have here is not exactly a conventional institutional history: the presentation, for example, lacks a continuous chronological story line. The multipleauthor approach also means that there is a fair amount of repetition in the various narratives. Even so, the editors should be congratulated for allocating space for the views of a substantial number of the Bank’s critics. A project that puts the critiques prominently on the record — and which thus facilitates serious appraisal of their respective strengths and weaknesses — should be welcomed as the Bank proceeds to rethink its

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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