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The "Wild Child" of 1990s Japan

The "Wild Child" of 1990s Japan The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Fall . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Tseng 2001.12.19 12:57 6482 SOUTH ATLANTIC QUARTERLY 99:4 / sheet 228 of 354 Andrea G. Arai of these images lies in what they reveal about this social anxiety, how the anxiety itself obscures a recognition of the historically specific location of ‘‘the child’’ at the center of national-cultural narratives, and in turn, how this anxiety shields from view the linkages between this specificity and the everyday realities of the Japanese child and family at the turn of the century. In the latter half of the twentieth century, tightly woven linkages that graduated to the level of the commonsensical between economic success and the uniqueness of the ‘‘nation-culture’’ Japan turned the development of the child and the parent-child relationship into a sui generis ground. This is not to say, however, that the general education of the child was not an object of national attention prior to the postwar period, but rather that the nature of this attention and investment has changed.3 All too often overlooked in the intensification of the site of ‘‘the child’’ in the postwar period has been the complex contribution of foreign http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

The "Wild Child" of 1990s Japan

South Atlantic Quarterly , Volume 99 (4) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-99-4-841
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Fall . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Tseng 2001.12.19 12:57 6482 SOUTH ATLANTIC QUARTERLY 99:4 / sheet 228 of 354 Andrea G. Arai of these images lies in what they reveal about this social anxiety, how the anxiety itself obscures a recognition of the historically specific location of ‘‘the child’’ at the center of national-cultural narratives, and in turn, how this anxiety shields from view the linkages between this specificity and the everyday realities of the Japanese child and family at the turn of the century. In the latter half of the twentieth century, tightly woven linkages that graduated to the level of the commonsensical between economic success and the uniqueness of the ‘‘nation-culture’’ Japan turned the development of the child and the parent-child relationship into a sui generis ground. This is not to say, however, that the general education of the child was not an object of national attention prior to the postwar period, but rather that the nature of this attention and investment has changed.3 All too often overlooked in the intensification of the site of ‘‘the child’’ in the postwar period has been the complex contribution of foreign

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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