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The Urbanization of Labor: LIVING-WAGE ACTIVISM IN THE AMERICAN CITY

The Urbanization of Labor: LIVING-WAGE ACTIVISM IN THE AMERICAN CITY Page 31 The Urbanization of Labor L I V I N G - WA G E A C T I V I S M I N T H E A M E R I C A N C I T Y For well over a decade now, practically all U.S. cities have been locked into a mode of urbanization best described as “entrepreneurial.” Webster’s Dictionary of American English defines entrepreneur as somebody “who organizes and manages an enterprise, especially a business, usually with considerable daring, skill and financial risk.” Anybody who knows anything about the fortunes of American cities throughout the 1980s and 1990s knows what “considerable daring, skill and financial risk” really boil down to. For whole cities themselves have assumed the status of enterprises, and they too are now managed with considerable daring, occasionally with skill, but seemingly always with financial risk. Indeed, the contemporary American city hustles inexorably to the tune of the bottom line and has become very adept at enhancing its “good business climate” reputation. Creating and re-creating healthy business climates has apparently been vital not only for the growth and continued financial viability of cities but also for the survival of every http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

The Urbanization of Labor: LIVING-WAGE ACTIVISM IN THE AMERICAN CITY

Social Text , Volume 18 (1 62) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-18-1_62-31
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 31 The Urbanization of Labor L I V I N G - WA G E A C T I V I S M I N T H E A M E R I C A N C I T Y For well over a decade now, practically all U.S. cities have been locked into a mode of urbanization best described as “entrepreneurial.” Webster’s Dictionary of American English defines entrepreneur as somebody “who organizes and manages an enterprise, especially a business, usually with considerable daring, skill and financial risk.” Anybody who knows anything about the fortunes of American cities throughout the 1980s and 1990s knows what “considerable daring, skill and financial risk” really boil down to. For whole cities themselves have assumed the status of enterprises, and they too are now managed with considerable daring, occasionally with skill, but seemingly always with financial risk. Indeed, the contemporary American city hustles inexorably to the tune of the bottom line and has become very adept at enhancing its “good business climate” reputation. Creating and re-creating healthy business climates has apparently been vital not only for the growth and continued financial viability of cities but also for the survival of every

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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