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THE STATUS OF "FOREIGN WORDS" IN ENGLISH: THE CASE OF EIGHT GERMAN WORDS

THE STATUS OF "FOREIGN WORDS" IN ENGLISH: THE CASE OF EIGHT GERMAN WORDS American Speech, Vol. 75, No. 2, Summer 2000 Copyright © 2000 by the American Dialect Society lexical and social environment of the host language, an identity that is not a clone of the same lexical item in the source language (Haugen 1950). The “new” identity of a foreign word would likely be affected by the language contact situation and the motivation for borrowing. For example, a bilingual context might well entail the importation of more of the full range of source language meaning and usage than would a context of mere cultural contact. The latter context, on the other hand, would more likely favor the adoption of a partial, perhaps marginal, specialized meaning. In an attempt to better understand the ways in which foreign words assume an identity and also to identify areas that require closer consideration in the future in better depicting the meaning and usage of foreign words in English, this article investigates the status of eight German words used without translation in English (including gemütlich). Attention is given to their degree of foreignness, their definitions, and to a certain extent their translatability as these factors relate to motivation for adoption, use, and accuracy of depiction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

THE STATUS OF "FOREIGN WORDS" IN ENGLISH: THE CASE OF EIGHT GERMAN WORDS

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-75-2-169
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Speech, Vol. 75, No. 2, Summer 2000 Copyright © 2000 by the American Dialect Society lexical and social environment of the host language, an identity that is not a clone of the same lexical item in the source language (Haugen 1950). The “new” identity of a foreign word would likely be affected by the language contact situation and the motivation for borrowing. For example, a bilingual context might well entail the importation of more of the full range of source language meaning and usage than would a context of mere cultural contact. The latter context, on the other hand, would more likely favor the adoption of a partial, perhaps marginal, specialized meaning. In an attempt to better understand the ways in which foreign words assume an identity and also to identify areas that require closer consideration in the future in better depicting the meaning and usage of foreign words in English, this article investigates the status of eight German words used without translation in English (including gemütlich). Attention is given to their degree of foreignness, their definitions, and to a certain extent their translatability as these factors relate to motivation for adoption, use, and accuracy of depiction.

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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