Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

The State, the Clock, and the Struggle: AN INQUIRY INTO THE DISCIPLINE FOR WELFARE REFORM IN MONTANA

The State, the Clock, and the Struggle: AN INQUIRY INTO THE DISCIPLINE FOR WELFARE REFORM IN MONTANA Page 109 The State, the Clock, and the Struggle AN INQ U IR Y IN TO THE D ISC IP L I N E F O R W E L FA R E R E F OR M I N M ON TA N A “Ending welfare as we know it” has become the mantra of U.S. social welfare policy in the 1990s. Structural understandings of poverty, homelessness, and unemployment have been disparaged or ignored in favor of behavioral judgments of the poor in the rhetoric of public policy makers.1 State after state has taken up the cause of “workfare,” mandatory labor in exchange for limited public assistance. The state of Montana is no exception to the national trend. In 1995, the state of Montana began to implement Families Achieving Independence in Montana (FAIM), a federally sanctioned, state-based alternative to the welfare reform policy laid out in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA). In keeping with the spirit of dominant discourses, FAIM’s stated goal is the replacement of “welfare dependency” with “selfsufficiency.” In this essay we examine the crafting of FAIM and the concomitant disciplinary practices that state welfare administrators imposed in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

The State, the Clock, and the Struggle: AN INQUIRY INTO THE DISCIPLINE FOR WELFARE REFORM IN MONTANA

Social Text , Volume 18 (1 62) – Mar 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/the-state-the-clock-and-the-struggle-an-inquiry-into-the-discipline-lMtUVsfp0I
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-18-1_62-109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 109 The State, the Clock, and the Struggle AN INQ U IR Y IN TO THE D ISC IP L I N E F O R W E L FA R E R E F OR M I N M ON TA N A “Ending welfare as we know it” has become the mantra of U.S. social welfare policy in the 1990s. Structural understandings of poverty, homelessness, and unemployment have been disparaged or ignored in favor of behavioral judgments of the poor in the rhetoric of public policy makers.1 State after state has taken up the cause of “workfare,” mandatory labor in exchange for limited public assistance. The state of Montana is no exception to the national trend. In 1995, the state of Montana began to implement Families Achieving Independence in Montana (FAIM), a federally sanctioned, state-based alternative to the welfare reform policy laid out in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA). In keeping with the spirit of dominant discourses, FAIM’s stated goal is the replacement of “welfare dependency” with “selfsufficiency.” In this essay we examine the crafting of FAIM and the concomitant disciplinary practices that state welfare administrators imposed in the

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.