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The State of Emergency and the Revival of American Imperialism: Toward an Authoritarian Post-Fordism

The State of Emergency and the Revival of American Imperialism: Toward an Authoritarian Post-Fordism I am grateful to Julia Adams, Michael Hardt, Julia Hell, Webb Keane, Jeff Paige, Ian Robinson, and participants in the Anthropology and History colloquium at the University of Michigan, 7 December 2001, for responses to an earlier version of this essay. Public Culture 15(2): 323–345 Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press Public Culture A different “Left” argument for continuity since September 11 has been presented by Michael Hardt, coauthor with Antonio Negri of the widely discussed Empire (2000).1 Empire is an impressive attempt to theorize broad, epochal sociocultural transformations that had started well before September 11.2 Hardt and Negri also articulate their historical narrative with an explicit political/ethical program. Their critique of the naive anti-Americanism of some strands of the antiglobalization movement is based on an analysis of a very specific historical period that began with the end of the Cold War, when the United States did cede some authority to international coalitions and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). I am also sympathetic to the book’s deployment of the regulationtheoretic approach and its allied concepts of Fordism and post-Fordism. Hardt and Negri connect the rise of the unique political-juridical form they call Empire to the emergence of the post-Fordist http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

The State of Emergency and the Revival of American Imperialism: Toward an Authoritarian Post-Fordism

Public Culture , Volume 15 (2) – Apr 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-15-2-323
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I am grateful to Julia Adams, Michael Hardt, Julia Hell, Webb Keane, Jeff Paige, Ian Robinson, and participants in the Anthropology and History colloquium at the University of Michigan, 7 December 2001, for responses to an earlier version of this essay. Public Culture 15(2): 323–345 Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press Public Culture A different “Left” argument for continuity since September 11 has been presented by Michael Hardt, coauthor with Antonio Negri of the widely discussed Empire (2000).1 Empire is an impressive attempt to theorize broad, epochal sociocultural transformations that had started well before September 11.2 Hardt and Negri also articulate their historical narrative with an explicit political/ethical program. Their critique of the naive anti-Americanism of some strands of the antiglobalization movement is based on an analysis of a very specific historical period that began with the end of the Cold War, when the United States did cede some authority to international coalitions and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). I am also sympathetic to the book’s deployment of the regulationtheoretic approach and its allied concepts of Fordism and post-Fordism. Hardt and Negri connect the rise of the unique political-juridical form they call Empire to the emergence of the post-Fordist

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2003

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