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The Short-Lived Avant-Garde: The Transformation of Yu Hua

The Short-Lived Avant-Garde: The Transformation of Yu Hua 1 Richard Murphy, Theorizing the Avant-Garde: Modernism, Expressionism, and the Problem of Postmodernity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 3. 2 Harold Rosenberg, “Collective, Ideological, Combative,” in Avant-Garde Art, ed. Thomas B. Hess and John Ashbery (London: Macmillan, 1968), 89. Modern Language Quarterly 63:1, March 2002. © 2002 University of Washington. MLQ ƒ March 2002 much critical attention and high expectations. But in less than a decade the avant-gardists ceased to be cultural front-runners and dissolved into discrete voices and professions. Chen Xiaoming, one of the major avant-garde critics, proclaimed the “boundless challenge” that the avant-garde launched against the literary and cultural establishments in its early years, but soon the “challenge” had lapsed into a “residual imagination,” as Chen’s second book on the avant-garde observes.3 Perhaps no one exemplifies the swift rise and fall of the Chinese avant-garde more clearly than Yu Hua (1960 –), a native of the prosperous southeastern province of Zhejiang and arguably one of the most radical avant-gardists. His short stories, mostly written in the late 1980s, have been touted as a “paradigmatic symbol of avant-garde fiction,”4 yet his novels and stories of the 1990s have largely effaced the elaborate formal devices of metafiction and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary History Duke University Press

The Short-Lived Avant-Garde: The Transformation of Yu Hua

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by University of Washington
ISSN
0026-7929
eISSN
1527-1943
DOI
10.1215/00267929-63-1-89
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Richard Murphy, Theorizing the Avant-Garde: Modernism, Expressionism, and the Problem of Postmodernity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 3. 2 Harold Rosenberg, “Collective, Ideological, Combative,” in Avant-Garde Art, ed. Thomas B. Hess and John Ashbery (London: Macmillan, 1968), 89. Modern Language Quarterly 63:1, March 2002. © 2002 University of Washington. MLQ ƒ March 2002 much critical attention and high expectations. But in less than a decade the avant-gardists ceased to be cultural front-runners and dissolved into discrete voices and professions. Chen Xiaoming, one of the major avant-garde critics, proclaimed the “boundless challenge” that the avant-garde launched against the literary and cultural establishments in its early years, but soon the “challenge” had lapsed into a “residual imagination,” as Chen’s second book on the avant-garde observes.3 Perhaps no one exemplifies the swift rise and fall of the Chinese avant-garde more clearly than Yu Hua (1960 –), a native of the prosperous southeastern province of Zhejiang and arguably one of the most radical avant-gardists. His short stories, mostly written in the late 1980s, have been touted as a “paradigmatic symbol of avant-garde fiction,”4 yet his novels and stories of the 1990s have largely effaced the elaborate formal devices of metafiction and

Journal

Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary HistoryDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2002

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