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The Seligman-Edgeworth Debate about the Analysis of Tax Incidence: The Advent of Mathematical Economics, 1892-1910

The Seligman-Edgeworth Debate about the Analysis of Tax Incidence: The Advent of Mathematical... History of Political Economy 35:2 (2003) that were published during his lifetime. By the third edition, published in 1910, Seligman’s arguments had reached something of a final mature form. Edgeworth took an early interest in the application of mathematics to social science questions, especially the blossoming theory of probability (Mirowski 1994, 30–47). In 1881, Edgeworth published his Mathematical Psychics, in which he remarkably extended utilitarian ethical theory in mathematical form and pioneered the analysis of exchange equilibrium in directions that have had an enormous influence on our modern understanding of equilibrium (Edgeworth [1881] 1995; Creedy 1998). In the first years of his appointment (1891) to the Drummond chair at All Souls College, Oxford, he engaged Seligman in matters that at first glance seem to have mostly to do with taxation theory. Edgeworth’s responses to Seligman appeared primarily in the Economic Journal, which he edited from 1891 until shortly before his death in 1926. His last response to Seligman appeared in the Economic Journal in 1910 and most curiously invoked his favorite principle of “unverified probability” from his ongoing statistical studies to put the fledgling mathematical method—as he understood it—on a more secure ground in economics (Edgeworth [1910] 1925). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

The Seligman-Edgeworth Debate about the Analysis of Tax Incidence: The Advent of Mathematical Economics, 1892-1910

History of Political Economy , Volume 35 (2) – Jun 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-35-2-205
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

History of Political Economy 35:2 (2003) that were published during his lifetime. By the third edition, published in 1910, Seligman’s arguments had reached something of a final mature form. Edgeworth took an early interest in the application of mathematics to social science questions, especially the blossoming theory of probability (Mirowski 1994, 30–47). In 1881, Edgeworth published his Mathematical Psychics, in which he remarkably extended utilitarian ethical theory in mathematical form and pioneered the analysis of exchange equilibrium in directions that have had an enormous influence on our modern understanding of equilibrium (Edgeworth [1881] 1995; Creedy 1998). In the first years of his appointment (1891) to the Drummond chair at All Souls College, Oxford, he engaged Seligman in matters that at first glance seem to have mostly to do with taxation theory. Edgeworth’s responses to Seligman appeared primarily in the Economic Journal, which he edited from 1891 until shortly before his death in 1926. His last response to Seligman appeared in the Economic Journal in 1910 and most curiously invoked his favorite principle of “unverified probability” from his ongoing statistical studies to put the fledgling mathematical method—as he understood it—on a more secure ground in economics (Edgeworth [1910] 1925).

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2003

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