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The Schmoller Renaissance

The Schmoller Renaissance History of Political Economy 33:1 (2001) Neoclassical economics was and still is dominant in Germany. Thus, even in his home country, Schmoller, who was early dubbed a “socialist of the chair” (Oppenheim 1872), was considered a “dead dog” (Kempski 1964, 200), his Grundriss an “unassailable mountain” (Salin 1944, 171), a “torso” (Kloten 1989, 10).4 Until recently it was said that “Schmoller is forever condemned and castigated” (Recktenwald 1965, 342).5 Even today, his posthumous works have not been analyzed, and no critical edition of his major works exists. The most complete bibliography can only be found in a book on Schmoller by a Greek political scientist (Giouras 1994, 139–71). In this light, the more astonishing fact is that in the last ten years a positive rediscovery of Schmoller has been happening.6 In 1988, two congresses on Schmoller were held to mark his 150th birthday—although the Verein für Socialpolitik, cofounded by Schmoller in 1872 and renamed Gesellschaft für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften-VfS, and the journal, once Schmollers Jahrbuch für Gesetzgebung, Verwaltung, und Volkswirtschaft im Deutschen Reiche but renamed Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsund Sozialwissenschaften, went conspicuously unmentioned. One congress was held partly in Trient, Italy (see Bock, Homann, and Schiera 1989), followed by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

The Schmoller Renaissance

History of Political Economy , Volume 33 (1) – Mar 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-33-1-71
Publisher site
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Abstract

History of Political Economy 33:1 (2001) Neoclassical economics was and still is dominant in Germany. Thus, even in his home country, Schmoller, who was early dubbed a “socialist of the chair” (Oppenheim 1872), was considered a “dead dog” (Kempski 1964, 200), his Grundriss an “unassailable mountain” (Salin 1944, 171), a “torso” (Kloten 1989, 10).4 Until recently it was said that “Schmoller is forever condemned and castigated” (Recktenwald 1965, 342).5 Even today, his posthumous works have not been analyzed, and no critical edition of his major works exists. The most complete bibliography can only be found in a book on Schmoller by a Greek political scientist (Giouras 1994, 139–71). In this light, the more astonishing fact is that in the last ten years a positive rediscovery of Schmoller has been happening.6 In 1988, two congresses on Schmoller were held to mark his 150th birthday—although the Verein für Socialpolitik, cofounded by Schmoller in 1872 and renamed Gesellschaft für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften-VfS, and the journal, once Schmollers Jahrbuch für Gesetzgebung, Verwaltung, und Volkswirtschaft im Deutschen Reiche but renamed Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsund Sozialwissenschaften, went conspicuously unmentioned. One congress was held partly in Trient, Italy (see Bock, Homann, and Schiera 1989), followed by

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2001

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