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The Rise of Adam Smith: Articles and Citations, 1970-1997

The Rise of Adam Smith: Articles and Citations, 1970-1997 History of Political Economy 34:1 (2002) Despite the theoretical attraction of the efficient market hypothesis, the marketplace itself did not seem to agree. Boulding’s tongue-in-cheek query was answered by a flood of scholarship on Smith, numbering more than six hundred articles and thirty books over the subsequent twentyseven years. Reviews of this burgeoning literature are undertaken elsewhere (Brown 1997; West 1988, 1978; Recktenwald 1978), as are assessments of Smith’s stature (Tribe 1999; Samuelson 1992; Stigler 1977; Black [1976] 1995). These surveys provide ample qualitative discussion of Smith’s reascendance. The present article adds a complementary quantitative analysis and classification of this literature. A number of questions arise. First, amid all the “noise” in the data, how would one measure whether attention to a long-dead figure has actually risen or fallen? For example, is the rise in interest “real” after controlling for scholarship inflation? Second, even if scholarship is found to have risen in real terms, how have the sources of this scholarship changed? If the rise over time is limited to history of thought journals, then this could indicate little mainstream interest, and the efficient market model could be vindicated on that account. Third, to what extent can a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

The Rise of Adam Smith: Articles and Citations, 1970-1997

History of Political Economy , Volume 34 (1) – Mar 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-34-1-55
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

History of Political Economy 34:1 (2002) Despite the theoretical attraction of the efficient market hypothesis, the marketplace itself did not seem to agree. Boulding’s tongue-in-cheek query was answered by a flood of scholarship on Smith, numbering more than six hundred articles and thirty books over the subsequent twentyseven years. Reviews of this burgeoning literature are undertaken elsewhere (Brown 1997; West 1988, 1978; Recktenwald 1978), as are assessments of Smith’s stature (Tribe 1999; Samuelson 1992; Stigler 1977; Black [1976] 1995). These surveys provide ample qualitative discussion of Smith’s reascendance. The present article adds a complementary quantitative analysis and classification of this literature. A number of questions arise. First, amid all the “noise” in the data, how would one measure whether attention to a long-dead figure has actually risen or fallen? For example, is the rise in interest “real” after controlling for scholarship inflation? Second, even if scholarship is found to have risen in real terms, how have the sources of this scholarship changed? If the rise over time is limited to history of thought journals, then this could indicate little mainstream interest, and the efficient market model could be vindicated on that account. Third, to what extent can a

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2002

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