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THE PRONUNCIATION OF MISSOURI: VARIATION AND CHANGE IN AMERICAN ENGLISH

THE PRONUNCIATION OF MISSOURI: VARIATION AND CHANGE IN AMERICAN ENGLISH American Speech, Vol. 78, No. 3, Fall 2003 Copyright © 2003 by the American Dialect Society a mer ic a n spe ec h 7 8 . 3 (2 0 0 3 ) figu re 1 Location of Missouri Indians on Marquette’s 1673 Map note: The symbol Œ represented [u] or [w], depending on the phonological environment, in sixteenth-century French orthography. for the people and R. PekittanŒi for the tributary. Marquette was still using a symbol for /u/ and /w/ that Pierre La Ramée had introduced into French orthography as part of an unsuccessful attempt at spelling reform a century earlier (Rickard 1968, 46–47). The symbol was an Œ, with two hornlike protrusions at the top, as shown in gure 1, often transliterated as ou. In the Illinois language, the term that Marquette wrote as VemessŒrit means ‘one who has a canoe’. It is often assumed that the Illinois used this term because the Siouan tribes living along the rapidly owing Missouri River used big canoes carved from logs, whereas the Peorias used smaller birch-bark canoes (cf. Lance 1999 and sources cited therein). The Algonquianist Michael McCafferty (pers. com., 2002) at Indiana University points out, however, that the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

THE PRONUNCIATION OF MISSOURI: VARIATION AND CHANGE IN AMERICAN ENGLISH

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-78-3-255
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Speech, Vol. 78, No. 3, Fall 2003 Copyright © 2003 by the American Dialect Society a mer ic a n spe ec h 7 8 . 3 (2 0 0 3 ) figu re 1 Location of Missouri Indians on Marquette’s 1673 Map note: The symbol Œ represented [u] or [w], depending on the phonological environment, in sixteenth-century French orthography. for the people and R. PekittanŒi for the tributary. Marquette was still using a symbol for /u/ and /w/ that Pierre La Ramée had introduced into French orthography as part of an unsuccessful attempt at spelling reform a century earlier (Rickard 1968, 46–47). The symbol was an Œ, with two hornlike protrusions at the top, as shown in gure 1, often transliterated as ou. In the Illinois language, the term that Marquette wrote as VemessŒrit means ‘one who has a canoe’. It is often assumed that the Illinois used this term because the Siouan tribes living along the rapidly owing Missouri River used big canoes carved from logs, whereas the Peorias used smaller birch-bark canoes (cf. Lance 1999 and sources cited therein). The Algonquianist Michael McCafferty (pers. com., 2002) at Indiana University points out, however, that the

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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