The Politics of/in Blogging in Iran

The Politics of/in Blogging in Iran Gholam Khiabany and Annabelle Sreberny ne of the well-recognized paradoxes of Iranian society is that while the “fat government” of the Islamic Republic filters Internet access, Persian bloggers number in the hundreds of thousands, making Persian among the top five mo popular languages of the global blogosphere. It is yet another paradox of Iran that while formal politics is conrained and configured by specifically Islamic sentiments and government sensibilities, Iranian youth — among other social categories — are developing powerful and poetic political voices, analyzing national and international issues and public and private concerns in their blogs. These issues are not sily a function of the sudden availability of new technologies or the exience of a large youthful population under thirty years old (eimated at 70 percent of the total population), although these are both contextual realities. Rather, these issues speak to a fundamental problem of the definition of the “political.” There exis a widespread perception of the Islamic Republic as a highly repressive ate in which there is little or no “politics,” this view itself being based on an overly crude diinction between repressive, undemocratic ates and democratic ates. However, we would argue that what is meant by the sphere of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/the-politics-of-in-blogging-in-iran-udvFJfYTe0
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1089-201X
DOI
10.1215/1089201x-2007-033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gholam Khiabany and Annabelle Sreberny ne of the well-recognized paradoxes of Iranian society is that while the “fat government” of the Islamic Republic filters Internet access, Persian bloggers number in the hundreds of thousands, making Persian among the top five mo popular languages of the global blogosphere. It is yet another paradox of Iran that while formal politics is conrained and configured by specifically Islamic sentiments and government sensibilities, Iranian youth — among other social categories — are developing powerful and poetic political voices, analyzing national and international issues and public and private concerns in their blogs. These issues are not sily a function of the sudden availability of new technologies or the exience of a large youthful population under thirty years old (eimated at 70 percent of the total population), although these are both contextual realities. Rather, these issues speak to a fundamental problem of the definition of the “political.” There exis a widespread perception of the Islamic Republic as a highly repressive ate in which there is little or no “politics,” this view itself being based on an overly crude diinction between repressive, undemocratic ates and democratic ates. However, we would argue that what is meant by the sphere of

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month