The Political Battlefield of Pro-Arab Video Games on Palestinian Screens

The Political Battlefield of Pro-Arab Video Games on Palestinian Screens HelgaTawilSouri ike everyone else in this Internet café in Ramallah, I rely on the place to offer me a cup of rong Arabic coffee as I wait for my e-mails to download on a slow, antiquated modem. It has become part of my afternoon routine. I am alone however in bringing earplugs. It is not because of the bombs and shootings, although it helps (in early 2003, we are in the mid of the Second Intifada and the Israeli military is wreaking havoc in town at lea once an hour), but because practically everyone in the center is screaming, throwing insults and threats that bounce off the barren walls: “I’m going to get you”; “You are over”; “Baard! Ju wait till I get you back.” No, the young men (mo of the clients are between the ages of twelve and twenty-five, very few of them female) are not shouting at one another but at characters in video games. While on a visit to a family in Jenin a few months later, a girl of twelve urges me to play a video game with her. “You have to play . . . you have to try this. This is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

The Political Battlefield of Pro-Arab Video Games on Palestinian Screens

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1089-201X
DOI
10.1215/1089201x-2007-031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HelgaTawilSouri ike everyone else in this Internet café in Ramallah, I rely on the place to offer me a cup of rong Arabic coffee as I wait for my e-mails to download on a slow, antiquated modem. It has become part of my afternoon routine. I am alone however in bringing earplugs. It is not because of the bombs and shootings, although it helps (in early 2003, we are in the mid of the Second Intifada and the Israeli military is wreaking havoc in town at lea once an hour), but because practically everyone in the center is screaming, throwing insults and threats that bounce off the barren walls: “I’m going to get you”; “You are over”; “Baard! Ju wait till I get you back.” No, the young men (mo of the clients are between the ages of twelve and twenty-five, very few of them female) are not shouting at one another but at characters in video games. While on a visit to a family in Jenin a few months later, a girl of twelve urges me to play a video game with her. “You have to play . . . you have to try this. This is

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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