Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Poet in the Public Sphere A Conversation with Meena Alexander: NEW YORK CITY, JANUARY 2002

The Poet in the Public Sphere A Conversation with Meena Alexander: NEW YORK CITY, JANUARY 2002 Social Text 72, Vol. 20, No. 3, Fall 2002. Copyright © 2002 by Duke University Press. fear. And the question of fear is important, as these are poems that deal with traumatic events. I have put aside the longish prose piece I was working on, a piece about childhood. After what has just happened in New York City I did not want to be swallowed up in the past, with so much molten and flowing all around, the world I love in turmoil. I need to bear witness to what is now. The lyric poem allows me much better to catch the edginess of things, the sharp nervosity, the flaming, falling buildings. And I think I must work back from the pressure of the present into the past, for that is the only way I will reach into the real. In all my work place is layered on place to make a palimpsest of sense. That is the kind of art I make. But the very indices of place have been altered by traumatic awareness. LB: How can we reconcile the tragic reality of what we are faced with and the aesthetics of poetic composition? MA: In the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

The Poet in the Public Sphere A Conversation with Meena Alexander: NEW YORK CITY, JANUARY 2002

Social Text , Volume 20 (3 72) – Sep 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/the-poet-in-the-public-sphere-a-conversation-with-meena-alexander-new-wLl0kiWldn
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-20-3_72-31
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social Text 72, Vol. 20, No. 3, Fall 2002. Copyright © 2002 by Duke University Press. fear. And the question of fear is important, as these are poems that deal with traumatic events. I have put aside the longish prose piece I was working on, a piece about childhood. After what has just happened in New York City I did not want to be swallowed up in the past, with so much molten and flowing all around, the world I love in turmoil. I need to bear witness to what is now. The lyric poem allows me much better to catch the edginess of things, the sharp nervosity, the flaming, falling buildings. And I think I must work back from the pressure of the present into the past, for that is the only way I will reach into the real. In all my work place is layered on place to make a palimpsest of sense. That is the kind of art I make. But the very indices of place have been altered by traumatic awareness. LB: How can we reconcile the tragic reality of what we are faced with and the aesthetics of poetic composition? MA: In the

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.