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The Place of the Economy in Turkish Society

The Place of the Economy in Turkish Society ing. Exchange and redistribution acquire their significance in the formal and legally binding context of market allocation and state intervention, while reciprocity is, in its nature, personal and informal. In general, relations of reciprocity follow the family metaphor in their different manifestations among fellow townsmen, neighbors, religious or ethnic community members, or within mafia-like organizations formed to realize illicit gain for their members. This theoretical approach guides Polanyi’s account of the nineteenthcentury market economy as a unique and unnatural phenomenon incompatible with human society. This observation does not refer to the economic role played by markets in many different societies in history, but approaches the market society as one where the economy as a whole is instituted as a series of self-regulating markets. In an attempt to develop this idea, Polanyi highlights the qualitative difference between exchange on the one hand, and redistribution and reciprocity on the other. The supporting institutional patterns of the latter are not only, or primarily, economic in nature. Hence, the state and kinship or community exist prior to, and independently of, whatever economic roles they play. On the other hand, market, the supporting institutional pattern of exchange, is solely economic in function. In http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

The Place of the Economy in Turkish Society

South Atlantic Quarterly , Volume 102 (2-3) – Apr 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-102-2-3-453
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ing. Exchange and redistribution acquire their significance in the formal and legally binding context of market allocation and state intervention, while reciprocity is, in its nature, personal and informal. In general, relations of reciprocity follow the family metaphor in their different manifestations among fellow townsmen, neighbors, religious or ethnic community members, or within mafia-like organizations formed to realize illicit gain for their members. This theoretical approach guides Polanyi’s account of the nineteenthcentury market economy as a unique and unnatural phenomenon incompatible with human society. This observation does not refer to the economic role played by markets in many different societies in history, but approaches the market society as one where the economy as a whole is instituted as a series of self-regulating markets. In an attempt to develop this idea, Polanyi highlights the qualitative difference between exchange on the one hand, and redistribution and reciprocity on the other. The supporting institutional patterns of the latter are not only, or primarily, economic in nature. Hence, the state and kinship or community exist prior to, and independently of, whatever economic roles they play. On the other hand, market, the supporting institutional pattern of exchange, is solely economic in function. In

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2003

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