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The Mothers of the Intifada in Liana Badr's The Eye of the Mirror

The Mothers of the Intifada in Liana Badr's The Eye of the Mirror The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Fall . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Tal Ezza’tar occupies a particular place in the Palestinian imaginary as a symbol of Palestinian history characterized by genocide, mass migration, cultural and political dispossession, and resistance to oppression. Located in the predominantly Christian-controlled part of Beirut, Tal Ezza’tar also represents the complexity of negotiating identity as an ethnic minority and the tensions that result from such negotiations. These tensions were exacerbated during the outbreak of the Lebanese civil war, when Palestinian refugees became victims of political and ethnic scapegoating that culminated in a bus massacre of Palestinian civilians by militiamen. These men were known to belong to right-wing Christian factions such as the Isolationists that comprised the Phalangists, Ahrar, and the Guardians of the Cedars. This tragedy marked the entry of the Palestinians into the Lebanese conflict under the coalition of the Joint Forces or the Nationalists that were made up of members of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) militia as well as leftist, nationalist Lebanese militias such as those belonging to the Progressive Socialist Party of the late Druze leader Kamal Jumblatt. Referred to as the ‘‘Stalingrad’’ of the Palestinian refugees, Tal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

The Mothers of the Intifada in Liana Badr's The Eye of the Mirror

South Atlantic Quarterly , Volume 102 (4) – Oct 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-102-4-809
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Fall . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Tal Ezza’tar occupies a particular place in the Palestinian imaginary as a symbol of Palestinian history characterized by genocide, mass migration, cultural and political dispossession, and resistance to oppression. Located in the predominantly Christian-controlled part of Beirut, Tal Ezza’tar also represents the complexity of negotiating identity as an ethnic minority and the tensions that result from such negotiations. These tensions were exacerbated during the outbreak of the Lebanese civil war, when Palestinian refugees became victims of political and ethnic scapegoating that culminated in a bus massacre of Palestinian civilians by militiamen. These men were known to belong to right-wing Christian factions such as the Isolationists that comprised the Phalangists, Ahrar, and the Guardians of the Cedars. This tragedy marked the entry of the Palestinians into the Lebanese conflict under the coalition of the Joint Forces or the Nationalists that were made up of members of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) militia as well as leftist, nationalist Lebanese militias such as those belonging to the Progressive Socialist Party of the late Druze leader Kamal Jumblatt. Referred to as the ‘‘Stalingrad’’ of the Palestinian refugees, Tal

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2003

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