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The Incorporation of the Palestinian Minority by the Israeli State, 1948-1970: ON THE NATURE, TRANSFORMATION, AND CONSTRAINTS OF COLLABORATION

The Incorporation of the Palestinian Minority by the Israeli State, 1948-1970: ON THE NATURE,... Ahmad H. Sa’di Social Text 75, Vol. 21, No. 2, Summer 2003. Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press. Al-Nakbah and Its Consequences The 1948 war is one of those momentous events about which the fourteenthcentury Arab social historian Ibn Khaldun wrote: “When there is a general change of conditions, it is as if the entire creation had changed and the whole world been altered” (quoted in Hourani 1992, 3). Indeed, AlNakbah (the immense catastrophe) challenged the basic tenets of the human existence of the Palestinians; the homeland, the place of residence, the land — a major source of wealth, dignity, and in uence — and the physical and cultural environment, the validity and endurance of which Palestinians had never questioned, turned out to be most insecure. Even the very existence of Palestinian society as an imagined community ceased to be taken for granted. After the end of the war, only a small minority of 160,000 out of the 900,000 Palestinians remained in the part of Palestine upon which Israel was established (Abu-Lughod 1971; see also Hadawi 1967). They were ruled by a military government that restricted their movements, controlled various aspects of their lives, and acted as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

The Incorporation of the Palestinian Minority by the Israeli State, 1948-1970: ON THE NATURE, TRANSFORMATION, AND CONSTRAINTS OF COLLABORATION

Social Text , Volume 21 (2 75) – Jun 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-21-2_75-75
Publisher site
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Abstract

Ahmad H. Sa’di Social Text 75, Vol. 21, No. 2, Summer 2003. Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press. Al-Nakbah and Its Consequences The 1948 war is one of those momentous events about which the fourteenthcentury Arab social historian Ibn Khaldun wrote: “When there is a general change of conditions, it is as if the entire creation had changed and the whole world been altered” (quoted in Hourani 1992, 3). Indeed, AlNakbah (the immense catastrophe) challenged the basic tenets of the human existence of the Palestinians; the homeland, the place of residence, the land — a major source of wealth, dignity, and in uence — and the physical and cultural environment, the validity and endurance of which Palestinians had never questioned, turned out to be most insecure. Even the very existence of Palestinian society as an imagined community ceased to be taken for granted. After the end of the war, only a small minority of 160,000 out of the 900,000 Palestinians remained in the part of Palestine upon which Israel was established (Abu-Lughod 1971; see also Hadawi 1967). They were ruled by a military government that restricted their movements, controlled various aspects of their lives, and acted as

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2003

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