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THE HISTORY OF GLQ, Volume 1: LGBTQ Studies, Censorship, and Other Transnational Problems

THE HISTORY OF GLQ, Volume 1: LGBTQ Studies, Censorship, and Other Transnational Problems On this happy and long-anticipated occasion of handing over the editorship of GLQ — who knew that David Halperin and I would be working on the journal for nearly fifteen years, making our editorial partnership the longest relationship either of us has ever had? — I want to reflect on the experience by looking back at the journal’s origins and peering forward into possibilities for its future. Thinking about the journal’s relationship to LGBTQ studies more generally, I would like to take this opportunity to speculate on both the past and the future of the field from my vantage point as founding coeditor. This history of GLQ begins in the queer urban United States in the early 1990s, shifts to Southeast Asia in the mid-1990s, and then comes back to the United States at the end of the millennium and continues to this day. It is a tale of intellectual exuberance in an explosively creative, new endeavor: a fresh generation of scholars was extending the freedoms and liberation won in the United States after Stonewall. The story then makes a geopolitical swerve: a crisis in our publisher’s production office in Malaysia forced us to recognize our own parochialism http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies Duke University Press

THE HISTORY OF GLQ, Volume 1: LGBTQ Studies, Censorship, and Other Transnational Problems

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2006 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1064-2684
eISSN
1527-9375
DOI
10.1215/10642684-12-1-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On this happy and long-anticipated occasion of handing over the editorship of GLQ — who knew that David Halperin and I would be working on the journal for nearly fifteen years, making our editorial partnership the longest relationship either of us has ever had? — I want to reflect on the experience by looking back at the journal’s origins and peering forward into possibilities for its future. Thinking about the journal’s relationship to LGBTQ studies more generally, I would like to take this opportunity to speculate on both the past and the future of the field from my vantage point as founding coeditor. This history of GLQ begins in the queer urban United States in the early 1990s, shifts to Southeast Asia in the mid-1990s, and then comes back to the United States at the end of the millennium and continues to this day. It is a tale of intellectual exuberance in an explosively creative, new endeavor: a fresh generation of scholars was extending the freedoms and liberation won in the United States after Stonewall. The story then makes a geopolitical swerve: a crisis in our publisher’s production office in Malaysia forced us to recognize our own parochialism

Journal

GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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