Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Geopolitics of Knowledge and the Colonial Difference

The Geopolitics of Knowledge and the Colonial Difference be one of the commentators in the workshop ‘‘Historical Capitalism, Coloniality of Power, and Transmodernity,’’ featuring presentations by Immanuel Wallerstein, Anibal Quijano, and Enrique Dussel. Speakers were asked to offer updates and to elaborate on the concepts attributed to them. Reflecting on ‘‘transmodernity,’’ Dussel made a remark that I take as a central point of my argument. According to Dussel, postmodern criticism of modernity is important and necessary, but it is not enough. The argument was developed by Dussel in his recent short but important dialogue with Gianni Vattimo’s work, which he characterized as a ‘‘eurocentric critique of modernity.’’ 1 What else can there be, beyond a Eurocentric critique of modernity and Eurocentrism? Dussel has responded to this question with the concept of transmodernity, by which he means that modernity is not a strictly European but a planetary phenomenon, to which the ‘‘excluded barbarians’’ have contributed, although their contribution has not been acknowledged. Dussel’s argument resembles, then, the South Asian Subaltern Studies project, although it has The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Winter . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. 6672 THE SOUTH ATLANTIC QUARTERLY / 101:1 / sheet 62 of 249 Walter D. Mignolo been made from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

The Geopolitics of Knowledge and the Colonial Difference

South Atlantic Quarterly , Volume 101 (1) – Jan 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/the-geopolitics-of-knowledge-and-the-colonial-difference-EzuGqVyitt
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-101-1-57
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

be one of the commentators in the workshop ‘‘Historical Capitalism, Coloniality of Power, and Transmodernity,’’ featuring presentations by Immanuel Wallerstein, Anibal Quijano, and Enrique Dussel. Speakers were asked to offer updates and to elaborate on the concepts attributed to them. Reflecting on ‘‘transmodernity,’’ Dussel made a remark that I take as a central point of my argument. According to Dussel, postmodern criticism of modernity is important and necessary, but it is not enough. The argument was developed by Dussel in his recent short but important dialogue with Gianni Vattimo’s work, which he characterized as a ‘‘eurocentric critique of modernity.’’ 1 What else can there be, beyond a Eurocentric critique of modernity and Eurocentrism? Dussel has responded to this question with the concept of transmodernity, by which he means that modernity is not a strictly European but a planetary phenomenon, to which the ‘‘excluded barbarians’’ have contributed, although their contribution has not been acknowledged. Dussel’s argument resembles, then, the South Asian Subaltern Studies project, although it has The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Winter . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. 6672 THE SOUTH ATLANTIC QUARTERLY / 101:1 / sheet 62 of 249 Walter D. Mignolo been made from

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.