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The Dramatic Monologue

The Dramatic Monologue Poetics Today 22:3 Following the definition of the genre, the rest of the first chapter is devoted to a short survey of the origins and development of the dramatic monologue. This includes a speculative discussion of the reasons for the genre’s birth and flowering in Victorian England (starting in the s) of all places and for its failure to acquire a significant presence outside English (and American) literature. The book’s second chapter, ‘‘The Victorians,’’ focuses on the work of the two major founders and practitioners of the genre, Robert Browning and Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and includes close readings of Browning’s ‘‘The Bishop Orders His Tomb at Saint Praxed’s Church’’ and Tennyson’s ‘‘Tithonus.’’ In this context Howe discusses the many differences in tone, atmosphere, setting, characterization, and language between the styles of the two poets. Chapter three examines the age of modernism by looking at representative works by Ezra Pound (‘‘Marvoil’’) and T. S. Eliot (‘‘Portrait of a Lady’’). For both poets the writing of dramatic monologues against the background of the Victorian tradition of the genre constituted an essential stage in their early development. Chapter four begins with a survey of dramatic monologues by other twentieth-century poets (e.g., http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Poetics Today: International Journal for Theory and Analysis of Literature and Communication Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Porter Institute for Poetics and Semiotics, Tel Aviv University
ISSN
0333-5372
eISSN
1527-5507
DOI
10.1215/03335372-22-3-703
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Poetics Today 22:3 Following the definition of the genre, the rest of the first chapter is devoted to a short survey of the origins and development of the dramatic monologue. This includes a speculative discussion of the reasons for the genre’s birth and flowering in Victorian England (starting in the s) of all places and for its failure to acquire a significant presence outside English (and American) literature. The book’s second chapter, ‘‘The Victorians,’’ focuses on the work of the two major founders and practitioners of the genre, Robert Browning and Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and includes close readings of Browning’s ‘‘The Bishop Orders His Tomb at Saint Praxed’s Church’’ and Tennyson’s ‘‘Tithonus.’’ In this context Howe discusses the many differences in tone, atmosphere, setting, characterization, and language between the styles of the two poets. Chapter three examines the age of modernism by looking at representative works by Ezra Pound (‘‘Marvoil’’) and T. S. Eliot (‘‘Portrait of a Lady’’). For both poets the writing of dramatic monologues against the background of the Victorian tradition of the genre constituted an essential stage in their early development. Chapter four begins with a survey of dramatic monologues by other twentieth-century poets (e.g.,

Journal

Poetics Today: International Journal for Theory and Analysis of Literature and CommunicationDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2001

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