Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The De-Germanization of Swedish Economics

The De-Germanization of Swedish Economics History of Political Economy 33:3 (2001) generation of Gunnar Myrdal, Bertil Ohlin, and others a few decades later. After that, we discuss the development of a few proxy variables for influence.2 We shall find that around the turn of the twentieth century about half of the foreign books in economics acquired by Swedish university libraries had been published in Germany; by 1954–55 the share had declined to 15 percent. A similar tendency obtains for works cited by authors of doctoral dissertations, and this tendency does not disappear in a regression analysis in which we control for a subfield and some other variables. Finally, we hint at some possible explanations for this de-Germanization. The process seems to have been particularly intense in the 1920s and 1940s, and an obvious hypothesis is that this was a result of the First World War and the Nazi period, including the Second World War, respectively. An alleged lingering importance of the historical school in Germany, the diminishing significance of geographical distance, and American demographic and academic growth are other factors that we discuss. The Founders’ Sources of Inspiration The founding of modern economics in Sweden is usually dated at the end of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

The De-Germanization of Swedish Economics

History of Political Economy , Volume 33 (3) – Sep 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/the-de-germanization-of-swedish-economics-CrvpgaULWX
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-33-3-517
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

History of Political Economy 33:3 (2001) generation of Gunnar Myrdal, Bertil Ohlin, and others a few decades later. After that, we discuss the development of a few proxy variables for influence.2 We shall find that around the turn of the twentieth century about half of the foreign books in economics acquired by Swedish university libraries had been published in Germany; by 1954–55 the share had declined to 15 percent. A similar tendency obtains for works cited by authors of doctoral dissertations, and this tendency does not disappear in a regression analysis in which we control for a subfield and some other variables. Finally, we hint at some possible explanations for this de-Germanization. The process seems to have been particularly intense in the 1920s and 1940s, and an obvious hypothesis is that this was a result of the First World War and the Nazi period, including the Second World War, respectively. An alleged lingering importance of the historical school in Germany, the diminishing significance of geographical distance, and American demographic and academic growth are other factors that we discuss. The Founders’ Sources of Inspiration The founding of modern economics in Sweden is usually dated at the end of the

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.