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The Canon in the History of Economics: Critical Essays

The Canon in the History of Economics: Critical Essays The Canon in the History of Economics: Critical Essays. Edited by Michalis Psalidopoulos. London: Routledge, 2000. xvi; 224 pp. £55.00. Do economists know what they should know from the past? How is the “canon” constructed in economics, and is the past transmitted efficiently to the present? As the profession comes to know the context of the attacks on political economy by the literary sages (Carlyle, Ruskin, Dickens, and Charles Kingsley, among others) in the mid–nineteenth century (Levy and Peart 2001–2), these questions take on new significance. They implicitly underscore many of the papers in The Canon in the History of Economics, edited by Michalis Psalidopoulos. In his brief introduction, Psalidopoulos notes that there has been much recent and ongoing debate about the construction and role of the canon in the humanities. Those debates have now begun to spill over to economics. This publication of essays originally presented in 1997 at the European Conference on the History of Economics in Athens is therefore timely. As in other disciplines, strong feelings are aroused by the notion of a canon in economics. Its definition is, indeed, ambiguous. There is, moreover, no consensus about how the economics canon was (and continues to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

The Canon in the History of Economics: Critical Essays

History of Political Economy , Volume 35 (2) – Jun 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-35-2-353
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Canon in the History of Economics: Critical Essays. Edited by Michalis Psalidopoulos. London: Routledge, 2000. xvi; 224 pp. £55.00. Do economists know what they should know from the past? How is the “canon” constructed in economics, and is the past transmitted efficiently to the present? As the profession comes to know the context of the attacks on political economy by the literary sages (Carlyle, Ruskin, Dickens, and Charles Kingsley, among others) in the mid–nineteenth century (Levy and Peart 2001–2), these questions take on new significance. They implicitly underscore many of the papers in The Canon in the History of Economics, edited by Michalis Psalidopoulos. In his brief introduction, Psalidopoulos notes that there has been much recent and ongoing debate about the construction and role of the canon in the humanities. Those debates have now begun to spill over to economics. This publication of essays originally presented in 1997 at the European Conference on the History of Economics in Athens is therefore timely. As in other disciplines, strong feelings are aroused by the notion of a canon in economics. Its definition is, indeed, ambiguous. There is, moreover, no consensus about how the economics canon was (and continues to

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2003

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