The Afterlife of the Romantic Child: Rousseau and Kant Meet Deleuze and Guattari

The Afterlife of the Romantic Child: Rousseau and Kant Meet Deleuze and Guattari The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Winter . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Frances Ferguson imaginary pupil Emile to cut him off from a world of adult influence, the better to identify and show off his capacities. On the other hand, this act of acknowledging the child’s age-specific capacities was part of an educational project that rested on constant age-segregation of children. If Emile’s tutor was both solicitous and admiring (albeit in his Spartan fashion), he was also leading the child along a very distinctly identified track. Rousseau’s attempts to see children and to see them clearly also involved segmenting the time of their lives into a series of stages and treating those stages as if they could be coherently described and predicted. The time of childhood, that is, became a space, and children came to have their own institutions and live in a world apart from adults.2 To put this point another way, Rousseau’s acknowledgment of childhood in itself was no simple act of perception; it also involved the practical development of a pedagogy that would usher children through a series of developmental stages and the practical sequestration of children from most adults. For if Rousseau http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

The Afterlife of the Romantic Child: Rousseau and Kant Meet Deleuze and Guattari

South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 102 (1) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-102-1-215
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Winter . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Frances Ferguson imaginary pupil Emile to cut him off from a world of adult influence, the better to identify and show off his capacities. On the other hand, this act of acknowledging the child’s age-specific capacities was part of an educational project that rested on constant age-segregation of children. If Emile’s tutor was both solicitous and admiring (albeit in his Spartan fashion), he was also leading the child along a very distinctly identified track. Rousseau’s attempts to see children and to see them clearly also involved segmenting the time of their lives into a series of stages and treating those stages as if they could be coherently described and predicted. The time of childhood, that is, became a space, and children came to have their own institutions and live in a world apart from adults.2 To put this point another way, Rousseau’s acknowledgment of childhood in itself was no simple act of perception; it also involved the practical development of a pedagogy that would usher children through a series of developmental stages and the practical sequestration of children from most adults. For if Rousseau

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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