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That Was Then, This Is Now: The Battle of Algiers and After

That Was Then, This Is Now: The Battle of Algiers and After Page 133 REFLECTIONS AND REPORTS David Prochaska The First Algerian War 1970s ack from South Asia where I had gone to avoid being sent to Southeast Asia, I saw The Battle of Algiers (La battaglia de Algeria, dir. Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966). In San Francisco, in the Fillmore district, a bright sunny Saturday afternoon, on a double bill with Buñuel’s Belle du jour (1967). From Catherine Deneuve to Ali la Pointe. After four hours, senses pummeled in the movie theater, I staggered out onto the street, shop fronts locked tight behind accordion-style metal gates drawn shut, liquor bottle broken glass littering the sidewalk. Streetfighting Man. Goat’s Head Soup. Got to Revolution. There and then, I knew I had to write a Ph.D. dissertation on Algeria, and that it could also be politically progressive, even radical. On Algeria, colonial Algeria, the story of colonialism in Algeria. And the more I read, the more I learned about what could be termed an “Algerian syndrome,” analogous to a “Vichy syndrome,” both defining moments of twentieth-century French history, both historical blind spots, freighted combinations of willed forgetfulness, collective denial, misremembering, and, first for Vichy and now increasingly for Algeria, the return of what http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Radical History Review Duke University Press

That Was Then, This Is Now: The Battle of Algiers and After

Radical History Review , Volume 2003 (85) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc.
ISSN
0163-6545
eISSN
1534-1453
DOI
10.1215/01636545-2003-85-133
Publisher site
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Abstract

Page 133 REFLECTIONS AND REPORTS David Prochaska The First Algerian War 1970s ack from South Asia where I had gone to avoid being sent to Southeast Asia, I saw The Battle of Algiers (La battaglia de Algeria, dir. Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966). In San Francisco, in the Fillmore district, a bright sunny Saturday afternoon, on a double bill with Buñuel’s Belle du jour (1967). From Catherine Deneuve to Ali la Pointe. After four hours, senses pummeled in the movie theater, I staggered out onto the street, shop fronts locked tight behind accordion-style metal gates drawn shut, liquor bottle broken glass littering the sidewalk. Streetfighting Man. Goat’s Head Soup. Got to Revolution. There and then, I knew I had to write a Ph.D. dissertation on Algeria, and that it could also be politically progressive, even radical. On Algeria, colonial Algeria, the story of colonialism in Algeria. And the more I read, the more I learned about what could be termed an “Algerian syndrome,” analogous to a “Vichy syndrome,” both defining moments of twentieth-century French history, both historical blind spots, freighted combinations of willed forgetfulness, collective denial, misremembering, and, first for Vichy and now increasingly for Algeria, the return of what

Journal

Radical History ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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