Terror and the Privatized State: A Peruvian Parable

Terror and the Privatized State: A Peruvian Parable Page 150 REFLECTIONS AND REPORTS Deborah Poole and Gerardo Rénique On March 20, 2002, nine months after the inauguration of Peru’s newly elected president, Alejandro Toledo, and two days before George W. Bush’s much anticipated trip to Peru, two simultaneous car bombs shattered the tranquility of an upper-class neighborhood a few blocks from the U.S. embassy in Lima. Nine people were killed and forty injured in the blasts, for which no one claimed responsibility. Rumors immediately began to circulate in Lima. Some speculated that perhaps the moribund forces of Abimael Guzmán’s once-strong Shining Path (Sendero Luminoso) party had gathered a new and unnoticed strength. Others cast a nervous glance backwards toward the still very real threat of the National Intelligence Services formerly headed by the now infamous criminal—and once-favored U.S. ally— Vladimiro Montesinos. Still others read the bombs as warnings from the FARC (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia, Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) and their Peruvian “narco” allies about the dangers of any further concessions to Bush’s “Colombia Plan.” Along with such rumors, however, Peruvians quickly relapsed into old habits. Security measures were increased, parties canceled, fear revived, and public life curtailed. The bombs had brought with them http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Radical History Review Duke University Press

Terror and the Privatized State: A Peruvian Parable

Radical History Review, Volume 2003 (85) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc.
ISSN
0163-6545
eISSN
1534-1453
D.O.I.
10.1215/01636545-2003-85-150
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 150 REFLECTIONS AND REPORTS Deborah Poole and Gerardo Rénique On March 20, 2002, nine months after the inauguration of Peru’s newly elected president, Alejandro Toledo, and two days before George W. Bush’s much anticipated trip to Peru, two simultaneous car bombs shattered the tranquility of an upper-class neighborhood a few blocks from the U.S. embassy in Lima. Nine people were killed and forty injured in the blasts, for which no one claimed responsibility. Rumors immediately began to circulate in Lima. Some speculated that perhaps the moribund forces of Abimael Guzmán’s once-strong Shining Path (Sendero Luminoso) party had gathered a new and unnoticed strength. Others cast a nervous glance backwards toward the still very real threat of the National Intelligence Services formerly headed by the now infamous criminal—and once-favored U.S. ally— Vladimiro Montesinos. Still others read the bombs as warnings from the FARC (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia, Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) and their Peruvian “narco” allies about the dangers of any further concessions to Bush’s “Colombia Plan.” Along with such rumors, however, Peruvians quickly relapsed into old habits. Security measures were increased, parties canceled, fear revived, and public life curtailed. The bombs had brought with them

Journal

Radical History ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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