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Tenure Denied: ANTI-UNIONISM AND ANTI-INTELLECTUALISM IN THE ACADEMY

Tenure Denied: ANTI-UNIONISM AND ANTI-INTELLECTUALISM IN THE ACADEMY Social Text 73, Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2002. Copyright © 2002 by Duke University Press. Joel Westheimer As a faculty member, it is not for me to say whether graduate students should choose to unionize. But I can say that the vast contributions they make to the university constitute “work.” ways university administrators — who are increasingly modeling themselves after corporate executives — respond when grassroots efforts to reassert democracy and pursue just working arrangements on campuses begin to gain strength. The focus here is on my case at New York University, but the implications reach farther: campuses across the country — like Columbia, Brown, Yale, Penn State, the University of Maryland, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Illinois, and the University of North Carolina — all have active organizing campaigns for teaching assistants and sometimes adjunct and even tenure-stream faculty. This essay is as much about their struggles as it is about those at NYU because, while particular circumstances vary, one disturbing trend remains constant: as university administrations increasingly look to the bottom line and displace educational goals with economic ones, the democratic ideal of the university will suffer, and so will our faculty and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Tenure Denied: ANTI-UNIONISM AND ANTI-INTELLECTUALISM IN THE ACADEMY

Social Text , Volume 20 (4 73) – Dec 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-20-4_73-47
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social Text 73, Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2002. Copyright © 2002 by Duke University Press. Joel Westheimer As a faculty member, it is not for me to say whether graduate students should choose to unionize. But I can say that the vast contributions they make to the university constitute “work.” ways university administrators — who are increasingly modeling themselves after corporate executives — respond when grassroots efforts to reassert democracy and pursue just working arrangements on campuses begin to gain strength. The focus here is on my case at New York University, but the implications reach farther: campuses across the country — like Columbia, Brown, Yale, Penn State, the University of Maryland, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Illinois, and the University of North Carolina — all have active organizing campaigns for teaching assistants and sometimes adjunct and even tenure-stream faculty. This essay is as much about their struggles as it is about those at NYU because, while particular circumstances vary, one disturbing trend remains constant: as university administrations increasingly look to the bottom line and displace educational goals with economic ones, the democratic ideal of the university will suffer, and so will our faculty and

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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