Teaching Circles: Supporting Shared Work and Professional Development

Teaching Circles: Supporting Shared Work and Professional Development Supporting Shared Work and Professional Development Margaret J. Marshall Since at least the end of the nineteenth century, small groups of teachers have come together to talk about their work in classrooms and expand their understanding of . The practice was common enough at the end of the nineteenth century that publications were directed to such groups. Emerson White’s 1901 book The Art of Teaching, for example, identifies a range of readers and contexts for learning about teaching in the title-page notation: “A manual for teachers, superintendents, teachers’ reading circles, normal schools, training classes and other persons interested in the right training of the young.” In higher education, the tradition of study or reading groups makes joining with others to work on teaching a recognizable format for an otherwise ignored need. Despite increased attention to teaching in higher education over the last twenty years, however, it is still more common for college-level teachers to discuss shared scholarly concerns than shared teaching interests, to hold each other accountable for the rigor of intellectual arguments more quickly than for classroom practices, or to offer criticism on scholarly or creative writing in progress more regularly than the writing directed to students. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture Duke University Press

Teaching Circles: Supporting Shared Work and Professional Development

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture, Volume 8 (3) – Oct 1, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/teaching-circles-supporting-shared-work-and-professional-development-J14ZQKdGR6
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2008 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1531-4200
DOI
10.1215/15314200-2008-003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Supporting Shared Work and Professional Development Margaret J. Marshall Since at least the end of the nineteenth century, small groups of teachers have come together to talk about their work in classrooms and expand their understanding of . The practice was common enough at the end of the nineteenth century that publications were directed to such groups. Emerson White’s 1901 book The Art of Teaching, for example, identifies a range of readers and contexts for learning about teaching in the title-page notation: “A manual for teachers, superintendents, teachers’ reading circles, normal schools, training classes and other persons interested in the right training of the young.” In higher education, the tradition of study or reading groups makes joining with others to work on teaching a recognizable format for an otherwise ignored need. Despite increased attention to teaching in higher education over the last twenty years, however, it is still more common for college-level teachers to discuss shared scholarly concerns than shared teaching interests, to hold each other accountable for the rigor of intellectual arguments more quickly than for classroom practices, or to offer criticism on scholarly or creative writing in progress more regularly than the writing directed to students.

Journal

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2008

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off