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Stylizing the Self: The Y Generation in Rosebank, Johannesburg

Stylizing the Self: The Y Generation in Rosebank, Johannesburg G G lobal cities, like New York, San Salvador, or Shanghai, have served as critical sites for the remixing and reassembling of racial identities. This has taken specific and concrete form in Johannesburg, where, particularly after 1994, the city has become a site for new media cultures as a wide range of radio stations, television talk shows, and local soap operas went on air and magazines were founded. Postarchitectural spaces, like billboards, came to be used to insert products, like cell phones or AIDS campaigns, into youth culture itself. Darrel Bristow-Bovey writes of the city’s skyline: The first time I arrived in Johannesburg by car it was midnight and I was tired. As I skirted the city centre heading north, I looked into the night sky and saw Naomi Campbell. Oh my, she was big. She hovered above me, glowing as though lit from within, etched in the heavens 50m tall, like every fat girl’s worst nightmare. . . . A Naomi stretched across one entire side of a twenty-storey building was my first introduction to Johannesburg’s peculiar culture of outdoor advertising. . . . Billboards are an intrinsic weave in the fabric of the city, a vital http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

Stylizing the Self: The Y Generation in Rosebank, Johannesburg

Public Culture , Volume 16 (3) – Oct 1, 2004

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-16-3-430
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

G G lobal cities, like New York, San Salvador, or Shanghai, have served as critical sites for the remixing and reassembling of racial identities. This has taken specific and concrete form in Johannesburg, where, particularly after 1994, the city has become a site for new media cultures as a wide range of radio stations, television talk shows, and local soap operas went on air and magazines were founded. Postarchitectural spaces, like billboards, came to be used to insert products, like cell phones or AIDS campaigns, into youth culture itself. Darrel Bristow-Bovey writes of the city’s skyline: The first time I arrived in Johannesburg by car it was midnight and I was tired. As I skirted the city centre heading north, I looked into the night sky and saw Naomi Campbell. Oh my, she was big. She hovered above me, glowing as though lit from within, etched in the heavens 50m tall, like every fat girl’s worst nightmare. . . . A Naomi stretched across one entire side of a twenty-storey building was my first introduction to Johannesburg’s peculiar culture of outdoor advertising. . . . Billboards are an intrinsic weave in the fabric of the city, a vital

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2004

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