Squatters, Space, and Belonging in the Underdeveloped City

Squatters, Space, and Belonging in the Underdeveloped City anomalous embodiment of the urban realm and public space. According to the United Nations, cities in the developed world are fast disappearing from the list of the world’s largest urban sites. For example, Lagos is projected to become the third-largest city in the world by 2010, after Tokyo and Mumbai. Such predictions suggest the inadequacy of recent attempts to theorize globalization by focusing exclusively on cities in the developed world.5 Urbanization has for the fi rst time become the predominant experience in many underdeveloped nations of the global South, with massive attendant transformations in the predominantly agrarian character of these cultures. Although cities in the underdeveloped world do not in general appear in the global city literature, they share many of the characteristics of such cities, including cultural and ethnic heterogeneity, transnational flows of labor and capital, and uneven spatial and social development. Indeed, the cities created by colonial-era urban planning actually anticipate many of the characteristics ascribed to the supposedly novel global cities. And, with the increasing internationalization of capital since the 1960s, peripheral and semiperipheral cities have grown important as industrial centers engaged in production for export to markets in core countries.6 Like their counterparts in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Squatters, Space, and Belonging in the Underdeveloped City

Social Text , Volume 22 (4 81) – Dec 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/squatters-space-and-belonging-in-the-underdeveloped-city-7AN9HS1buj
Publisher
Duke Univ Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
D.O.I.
10.1215/01642472-22-4_81-17
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

anomalous embodiment of the urban realm and public space. According to the United Nations, cities in the developed world are fast disappearing from the list of the world’s largest urban sites. For example, Lagos is projected to become the third-largest city in the world by 2010, after Tokyo and Mumbai. Such predictions suggest the inadequacy of recent attempts to theorize globalization by focusing exclusively on cities in the developed world.5 Urbanization has for the fi rst time become the predominant experience in many underdeveloped nations of the global South, with massive attendant transformations in the predominantly agrarian character of these cultures. Although cities in the underdeveloped world do not in general appear in the global city literature, they share many of the characteristics of such cities, including cultural and ethnic heterogeneity, transnational flows of labor and capital, and uneven spatial and social development. Indeed, the cities created by colonial-era urban planning actually anticipate many of the characteristics ascribed to the supposedly novel global cities. And, with the increasing internationalization of capital since the 1960s, peripheral and semiperipheral cities have grown important as industrial centers engaged in production for export to markets in core countries.6 Like their counterparts in

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off