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Spectral Housing and Urban Cleansing: Notes on Millennial Mumbai

Spectral Housing and Urban Cleansing: Notes on Millennial Mumbai ities like Bombay—now Mumbai—have no clear place in the stories told so far that link late capitalism, globalization, post-Fordism, and the growing dematerialization of capital. Their history is uneven — in the sense made commonsensical by a certain critical tradition in Marxism. It is also characterized by disjunct, yet adjacent, histories and temporalities. In such cities, Fordist manufacture, craft and artisanal production, service economies involving law, leisure, finance, and banking, and virtual economies involving global finance capital and local stock markets live in an uneasy mix. Certainly, these cities are the loci of the practices of predatory global capital — here Mumbai belongs with Bangkok, Hong Kong, Saõ Paulo, Los Angeles, Mexico City, London, and Singapore. But these cities also produce the social black holes of the effort to embrace and This essay is dedicated to my friends in the Housing Alliance (SPARC, NSDF, and Mahila Milan) in Mumbai who are producing their own radical projects for housing in Bombay, based on situated secularism, grassroots energy, gender equity, and deep democracy. I must also thank my hosts and audiences for helpful comments and reactions at the conference on “Cosmopolitanism,” University of Chicago (May 1999), and the conference on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

Spectral Housing and Urban Cleansing: Notes on Millennial Mumbai

Public Culture , Volume 12 (3) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-12-3-627
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ities like Bombay—now Mumbai—have no clear place in the stories told so far that link late capitalism, globalization, post-Fordism, and the growing dematerialization of capital. Their history is uneven — in the sense made commonsensical by a certain critical tradition in Marxism. It is also characterized by disjunct, yet adjacent, histories and temporalities. In such cities, Fordist manufacture, craft and artisanal production, service economies involving law, leisure, finance, and banking, and virtual economies involving global finance capital and local stock markets live in an uneasy mix. Certainly, these cities are the loci of the practices of predatory global capital — here Mumbai belongs with Bangkok, Hong Kong, Saõ Paulo, Los Angeles, Mexico City, London, and Singapore. But these cities also produce the social black holes of the effort to embrace and This essay is dedicated to my friends in the Housing Alliance (SPARC, NSDF, and Mahila Milan) in Mumbai who are producing their own radical projects for housing in Bombay, based on situated secularism, grassroots energy, gender equity, and deep democracy. I must also thank my hosts and audiences for helpful comments and reactions at the conference on “Cosmopolitanism,” University of Chicago (May 1999), and the conference on

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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