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Soweto Now

Soweto Now 16(3): 499–506 Copyright © 2004 by Duke University Press territories that help to defy ready-made categorizations of this site of extremely complex interconnections. As their responses make clear, Khunou and Dlamini do not hesitate to read township life and experience as a text and as an emblem of the global city. Both of them seem to suggest that in spite of the overwhelming poverty of many of the township’s residents, new cultures of commodification are emerging. These cultures underlie new aesthetic forms, of which cell phones, cars, and various registers of fashion are but examples. Both also point to various ways in which the township, although invented by the apartheid state, was and continues to be produced well beyond the apartheid moment. In very subtle ways, they seize on apparently marginal details of everyday life to show how, gradually, township residents are moving beyond the spatialities and temporalities of apartheid.— A. M. Achille Mbembe: How would you define “the township”? What distinguishes it from, say, the city, the inner city, the squatter camp, or the homeland? Nsizwa Dlamini: Well, when I think of “the township,” I think of it as a largely racialized space created by the apartheid http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-16-3-499
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

16(3): 499–506 Copyright © 2004 by Duke University Press territories that help to defy ready-made categorizations of this site of extremely complex interconnections. As their responses make clear, Khunou and Dlamini do not hesitate to read township life and experience as a text and as an emblem of the global city. Both of them seem to suggest that in spite of the overwhelming poverty of many of the township’s residents, new cultures of commodification are emerging. These cultures underlie new aesthetic forms, of which cell phones, cars, and various registers of fashion are but examples. Both also point to various ways in which the township, although invented by the apartheid state, was and continues to be produced well beyond the apartheid moment. In very subtle ways, they seize on apparently marginal details of everyday life to show how, gradually, township residents are moving beyond the spatialities and temporalities of apartheid.— A. M. Achille Mbembe: How would you define “the township”? What distinguishes it from, say, the city, the inner city, the squatter camp, or the homeland? Nsizwa Dlamini: Well, when I think of “the township,” I think of it as a largely racialized space created by the apartheid

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2004

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